[NetBehaviour] Scientists add emotions to robotic hea

Simon Biggs s.biggs at eca.ac.uk
Mon Nov 24 17:51:09 CET 2008


Mmmm?

Stelarc¹s position is probably somewhat more sophisticated (and anarchic)
than this writer indicates. However, I agree there is something inherently
dualist in his thinking. I would not propose that this is Christian but
refers to earlier lines of thinking (Plato) that influenced early Church
thought (the Scholastics) and continues to be congruent with a lot of
mainstream science. Mind you (no pun intended), many scientists are now
engaging a less dualistic frame for their research. Andy Clark and Daniel
Dennett write on this.

Regards

Simon


On 24/11/08 16:29, "marc garrett" <marc.garrett at furtherfield.org> wrote:

> Hi Simon,
> 
> Just before you sent this - I was reading this article regarding Stelarc...
> 
> 
> "Australian artist Stelarc refers to himself as a 'post-human engineer'
> also used the human body in his work. His work was a lot more
> technologically focused than Orlan's - which was largly cosmetic.
> Stelarc was highly concerned about our physical relationship with modern
> technology - he thought that perhaps technology is moving too fast and
> we are getting left behind. To Stelarc, machines are becoming more
> useful than we are, and are beginning to possess better capabilities, to
> which we are able to compare. Stelarc's projects mean that his body
> movements have become involuntary, and he no longer has control over
> what movements his body makes. Stelarc's reinvention of the body for
> what he refers to as 'post plannatory environments' - a Matrix - like
> idea - show that he believes that our natural form is simply not enough
> to survive on 'Planet one' in the future, as technology is advancing at
> such high-speed. Stelarc does not refer to his body as his own - this
> distansiation with his own body could distinguish him as a Christian
> artist (independance of soul) - However Stelac strongly denies this
> claim. Stelarc states that his overall aim is for humans to have the
> ability to live without a physical form. He sees the body as a support
> mechanism for conciousness, and is not necessarily needed for human
> survival. He believes that conciousness can be captured in a
> technological form / platform, which would remove us from our current
> physical restraints."
> 
> http://louise-ruddick.blog.co.uk/2008/01/14/the_post_human_technological~35781
> 68
> 
>> > Check out Stelarc¹s take on this
>> >
>> > http://thinkinghead.edu.au/
>> >
>> > Regards
>> >
>> > Simon
>> >
>> >
>> > On 24/11/08 16:01, "marc garrett" <marc.garrett at furtherfield.org> wrote:
>> >
>> >   
>>> >> Scientists add emotions to robotic head.
>>> >>
>>> >> Claiming that service-class robots will one day be pervasive,
>>> >> researchers at the University of the West of England's Bristol Robotics
>>> >> Laboratory (BRL) have begun investigating ways to make robots seem more
>>> >> human.
>>> >>
>>> >> Just as PCs are now common in households, workplaces, and parts of our
>>> >> environment, BRL expects "service-class" robotic devices to become "a
>>> >> pervasive element of our future society." This will represent a "huge
>>> >> opportunity for life enhancement and commercial exploitation," the lab
>>> adds.
>>> >>
>>> >> Typical occupations for tomorrow's robotic underlings are expected to
>>> >> include:
>>> >>
>>> >> * Aids for the elderly
>>> >> * Domestic servants
>>> >> * Tour guides
>>> >> * Hotel porters
>>> >> * Non beer-drinking "assistants" on construction sites
>>> >> * Leisure/gaming robots
>>> >> * Numerous military roles
>>> >> * "...and so on"
>>> >>
>>> >> Since service-class robots will occupy environments that contain people,
>>> >> there's a fundamental need for them to interact in an easy and natural
>>> >> manner with their human companions, BRL notes.
>>> >>
>>> >> more...
>>> >> http://www.deviceguru.com/scientists-add-emotions-to-robotic-head/
>>> >> _______________________________________________
>>> >> NetBehaviour mailing list
>>> >> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
>>> >> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>>> >>     
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > Simon Biggs
>> > Research Professor
>> > edinburgh college of art
>> > s.biggs at eca.ac.uk
>> > www.eca.ac.uk
>> > www.eca.ac.uk/circle/
>> >
>> > simon at littlepig.org.uk
>> > www.littlepig.org.uk
>> > AIM/Skype: simonbiggsuk
>> >
>> >
>> > Edinburgh College of Art (eca) is a charity registered in Scotland, number
>> SC009201
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >   
>> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > NetBehaviour mailing list
>> > NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
>> > http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> 
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour



Simon Biggs
Research Professor
edinburgh college of art
s.biggs at eca.ac.uk
www.eca.ac.uk
www.eca.ac.uk/circle/

simon at littlepig.org.uk
www.littlepig.org.uk
AIM/Skype: simonbiggsuk


Edinburgh College of Art (eca) is a charity registered in Scotland, number SC009201


-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <https://lists.netbehaviour.org/pipermail/netbehaviour/attachments/20081124/0d838162/attachment.html>


More information about the NetBehaviour mailing list