[NetBehaviour] Nine Words You Might Think Came from Science but Which Are Really from Science Fiction.

marc garrett marc.garrett at furtherfield.org
Tue Apr 7 16:16:39 CEST 2009


Yes - I noticed this afterwards...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karel_%C4%8Capek#Etymology_of_robot

marc
> Asimov may indeed have come up with the term 'robotics', however the word
> robot was introduced to the public by Czech writer Karel Čapek in his play
> R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots)1921- it's a derivation of the Czech word
> for worker/slave
>
> This has come up in the forum posts
>
> So there
>
> C
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: netbehaviour-bounces at netbehaviour.org
> [mailto:netbehaviour-bounces at netbehaviour.org] On Behalf Of marc garrett
> Sent: 07 April 2009 10:15 AM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> Subject: [NetBehaviour] Nine Words You Might Think Came from Science but
> Which Are Really from Science Fiction.
>
> Nine Words You Might Think Came from Science but Which Are Really from 
> Science Fiction.
>
> 1. Robotics. This is probably the most well-known of these, since Isaac 
> Asimov is famous for (among many other things) his three laws of 
> robotics. Even so, I include it because it is one of the only actual 
> sciences to have been first named in a science fiction story ("Liar!", 
> 1941). Asimov also named the related occupation (roboticist) and the 
> adjective robotic.
>
> 2. Genetic engineering. The other science that received its name from a 
> science fiction story, in this case Jack Williamson's novel Dragon's 
> Island, which was coincidentally published in the same year as "Liar!" 
> The occupation of genetic engineer took a few more years to be named, 
> this time by Poul Anderson.
>
> 3. Zero-gravity/zero-g. A defining feature of life in outer space (sans 
> artificial gravity, of course). The first known use of "zero-gravity" is 
> from Jack Binder (better known for his work as an artist) in 1938, and 
> actually refers to the gravityless state of the center of the Earth's 
> core. Arthur C. Clarke gave us "zero-g" in his 1952 novel Islands in the 
> Sky.
>
> 4. Deep space. One of the other defining features of outer space is its 
> essential emptiness. In science fiction, this phrase most commonly 
> refers to a region of empty space between stars or that is remote from 
> the home world. E. E. "Doc" Smith seems to have coined this phrase in 
> 1934. The more common use in the sciences refers to the region of space 
> outside of the Earth's atmosphere.
>
> more...
> http://blog.oup.com/2009/03/science-fiction/
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