[NetBehaviour] Close to the Machine: Code and the Mesmerism of Building a World from Scratch

James Morris james at jwm-art.net
Sun Jul 29 21:51:20 CEST 2012


On 29/07/12 Simon Biggs <simon at littlepig.org.uk> wrote:
>Perhaps they mean 1967? But that remains much later than any dawn,
>into the second generation of electronic computing. Realistically you
>would have to say the dawn was closer to 1947 - but that depends on
>how you define a computer. It could be considered to have dawned far
>earlier. This author could benefit from some texts by Zielinski,
>Parrikki or Huhtamo, on media archeology, in their Christmas stocking
>this year?


perhaps 1947 was midnight, what came before it was yesterday, 1997 is
dawn, and we're just getting out of bed for work on a monday
morning ;-)



>
>best
>
>Simon
>
>
>On 29 Jul 2012, at 11:55, Tom Keene wrote:
>
>> Perhaps I'm missing something, but "dawn of computer revolution in
>> 1997" made me double take. The beginning of the computer evolution
>> in 1997! Come on, the conditions which gave rise to a computer
>> revolution go way way back - its not possible to use specific dates
>> that mark the beginning, the world doesn't work like that, there are
>> many strands and trajectories of technological and human histories,
>> the formative years of the telegraph to name but one, that made it
>> inevitable that the current conditions of this technological age
>> would take place. But then I haven't read the book....;) Tom
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> On Thu, Jul 26, 2012 at 10:35 PM, marc
>> <marc.garrett at furtherfield.org> wrote: Close to the Machine: Code
>> and the Mesmerism of Building a World from Scratch
>> 
>> by Maria Popova
>> 
>> The sociocultural relationship between humanity and technology has
>> been the subject of equal parts dystopianism, utopianism, and layered
>> reflection. But what of the actual, intimate, one-on-one relationship
>> between human and machine, creator and created? That’s exactly what
>> software engineer Ellen Ullman explores in Close to the Machine:
>> Technophilia and Its Discontents (public library) — a fascinating
>> look at the riveting dawn of computer revolution in 1997, those
>> formative years of learning to translate the inexorable messiness of
>> being human into elegant and organized code, examined through
>> Ullman’s singular lens of being a rare woman on this largely
>> male-driven forefront.
>> 
>> http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/07/26/close-to-the-machine-ellen-ullman/
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
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>> 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> TOM KEENE | THE ANTHILL SOCIAL
>> ><> Artist. Interactive Designer. Programmer.
>> ><> 07930 573 944
>> ><> 47 Hardel walk, Tulse Hill, SW2 2QG
>> ><> tom at theanthillsocial.co.uk
>> ><> www.theanthillsocial.co.uk
>> _______________________________________________
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>
>
>Simon Biggs
>simon at littlepig.org.uk http://www.littlepig.org.uk/ @SimonBiggsUK
>skype: simonbiggsuk
>
>s.biggs at ed.ac.uk Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh
>http://www.eca.ac.uk/circle/  http://www.elmcip.net/
>http://www.movingtargets.co.uk/ MSc by Research in Interdisciplinary
>Creative Practices
>http://www.ed.ac.uk/studying/postgraduate/degrees?id=656&cw_xml=details.php
>



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