[NetBehaviour] Georgio Morandi: Lines of Poetry.

bob catchpole bobcatchpole at yahoo.co.uk
Sat Jan 26 20:07:12 CET 2013


Michael,

For me, the key insight of your first posting was the observation that powerful life affirming works of art have been created by artists whose convictions were plainly less than affirmative, and sometimes downright nasty. That in those cases, their achievement and talent transcended their own personal ideologies. An interesting remark.

By extension, I suppose this could also be applied to some great athletes and sportspeople whose brilliant life enhancing triumphs have been achieved despite, and not because of, their intellectual prowess.

Bob  




>________________________________
> From: Michael Szpakowski <szpako at yahoo.com>
>To: "aha at aharonic.net" <aha at aharonic.net>; NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org> 
>Sent: Saturday, 26 January 2013, 16:40
>Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Georgio Morandi: Lines of Poetry.
> 
>
>Good point.
>I've never seen Triumph of the Will.
>I think I'd reply,as best I can, that
>I wrote of a "grace ... which is available to artists". I didn't suggest this was in any way automatic.
>I suspect Triumph of the Will and other Reifenstahl is less art than superbly crafted propaganda - 
>I think I'd probably want to put it on a level with a well made advertisment, something from which one might
>learn but which exists for instumental reasons, those reasons here being particularly vile ones.
>
>I'm not too thrilled by the prospect but I will try and see the film at some point so I can speak from a 
>more informed position. ( A similar case is "Birth of a Nation", of course).
>
>I'm old fashioned enough to think that the word 'truth' is one useful litmus concept for artworks. I don't mean that we
>mine from a
 work some sort of verbal paraphrase and then subject this to some kind of logical analysis, more that we
>demand that a work corresponds in all its aspects to our sense of the richness of the world including how the world is ( 
>scientific, historical, physical - forgive me post-modernists - fact being part, but not all, of this.)
>
>This is all pretty provisional - thanks for making me think.
>cheers
>michael
>
>
>
>________________________________
> From: aharon <aha at aharonic.net>
>To: Michael Szpakowski <szpako at yahoo.com>; NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org> 
>Sent: Saturday, January 26, 2013 1:25 AM
>Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Georgio Morandi: Lines of Poetry.
> 
>Hi Michael and all,
>
>> I love Morandi's work and I shall definitely go to see the show at the
>> Estorick.
>> Morandi is an enigma - that someone who was an active member of the
>> Italian Fascist party
>> could produce work that is so utterly... - if life affirming wasn't a
>> cliche I'd say life affirming -
>>
>> utterly enchanting, humane, enriching...
>> I can't help thinking, though, Heidegger is a putative friend, interpreter
>> or advocate Morandi doesn't need.
>>
>> Where Morandi is great despite his politicsHeidegger is completely and
>> forever tainted  by
>>
>>
 his active andnever publicly repented membership of the Nazi party.
>> It strikes me there's a kind of grace here which is available to artists
>> and not to philosophers. Ultimately
>>
>> all philosophy is a call to action or at least a framework for it. Art, on
>> the contrary, enables even the
>> personally wicked or the politically vile the redemptive act of looking
>> carefully and making something to
>> show us, be it painting , poem, music or whatever which makes us more
>> deeply human.
>
>Does this view includes Leni Riefenstahl?
>
>Cheers!
>
>Aharon
>xx
>
>> michael
>>
>>
>>
>> ________________________________
>>  From: netbehaviour <netbehaviour at furtherfield.org>
>> To: netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org
>> Sent: Wednesday, January 23, 2013 10:57 AM
>> Subject: [NetBehaviour] Georgio Morandi: Lines of Poetry.
>>
>> Georgio Morandi: Lines of Poetry.
>>
>> by Robert Jackson.
>>
>> "There is a new exhibition on Georgio Morandi at the Estorick
>> Collection, London, called Lines of Poetry. I’ve heard that they’ve
>> brought together quite a few drawings and watercolours not previously
>> seen in the UK – and more excitingly it collects all of the most
>> important graphic work he did, including drawings there weren’t
>> characteristically still-life.
>>
>> I was never really interested in Morandi’s work, until I saw a
>> conference lecture given by one of my tutors – John Chilver – on
>> Morandi
>> and Heidegger’s ‘The Thing”. I was about 22 I think, and I
 certainly
>> wasn’t in the capacity to absorb anything about Heidegger at that point
>> (it was published somewhere I believe), but I remember the oddness and
>> intensity of the works. Now of course, I see clear and obvious links
>> between Morandi’s strange, haunting grasp of still-life objects forever
>> ungraspable and Heidegger’s own musings about the withdrawn,
>> self-supporting jug."
>>
>> http://robertjackson.info/index/2013/01/georgio-morandi-lines-of-poetry/
>>
>> Robert Jackson is also a writer/reviewer on Furtherfield.
>> His recent article is 'Algorithms and Control'
>> http://www.furtherfield.org/features/algorithms-and-control
>>
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