[NetBehaviour] NetBehaviour Digest, Vol 2132, Issue 1

nils.jean at network.rca.ac.uk nils.jean at network.rca.ac.uk
Wed Sep 17 14:04:56 CEST 2014



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Subject: NetBehaviour Digest, Vol 2132, Issue 1

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Today's Topics:

1. Re: The privileged few are tightening their grip on the arts
(ruth catlow)
2. IS it pre-history (rinus van alebeek)
3. Re: ISIS prehistory (Alan Sondheim)
4. Re: ISIS prehistory (Alan Sondheim)
5. Re: ISIS prehistory (Alan Sondheim)
6. Re: IS it pre-history (Alan Sondheim)
7. Everyone in Love in the "Middle East" (related but	not the
same) (Alan Sondheim)
8. Re: IS it pre-history (Ana Vald?s)
9. Re: The privileged few are tightening their grip on the arts
(Patrick Lichty)
10. alternative truths - comic (dave miller)
11. Re: The privileged few are tightening their grip on the arts
(Patrick Lichty)
12. Re: IS it pre-history (Joel Weishaus)
13. Re: ISIS prehistory (James Morris)
14. Re: ISIS prehistory (Joel Weishaus)
15. Re: ISIS prehistory (Ana Vald?s)
16. Qinq (Alan Sondheim)
17. Fwd: ELO 2015 in Bergen - The End(s) of Electronic	Literature
- Call for Participation (Simon Biggs)


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 13:36:07 +0100
From: ruth catlow <ruth.catlow at furtherfield.org>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their
grip on the arts
Message-ID: <54182EB7.5040501 at furtherfield.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"; Format="flowed"

Patrick - respect is due to you for your work and the impact of the many 
tactical media artists (Yes Men, Etoy, Ubermorgen etc.) who address 
power where it swaggers.

However "recognition by the money elite" currently also impacts (through 
money and mass-media ties) wider access to all kinds of arts (their 
creation and appreciation) by more diverse people.

It's not only about artists' working conditions, but about what kind of 
society we want, and about how to provide ways for all of us to engage, 
stimulate and "better ourselves" (individually and collectively). 
Shopping is not enough.

We can also end up arguing the toss about whether, when we are eeking 
out the last few pennies from our stricken public coffers, whether we 
choose to commission an artist or pay for life saving health care. The 
"a luxury or a life" argument. But this ignores the fact that austerity 
ideologies justify subsidy and support to many other more well heeled 
sectors of society. Which I think brings us back again to Michael's 
post; ) "The marginalisation of working class voices in the arts is a 
consequence of the fact that our rulers believe they have us licked and 
under control in general."

It's good to see a-n building up an argument from different perspectives 
as part of their Paying Artists campaign.
http://www.a-n.co.uk/tag/paying-artists



On 15/09/2014 19:35, Patrick Lichty wrote:
>
> Honestly, I think it just depends if you want to be recognized by 
> money elite. We have been doing work that has gotten press for 
> decades on a small budget, but I agree it gets tiring to do work 
> continually that is never funded for decades. It leaves you a little 
> tired and with a lot less money than you might have had for retirement 
> (I mean at 90, you gits!)
>
> *From:*netbehaviour-bounces at netbehaviour.org 
> [mailto:netbehaviour-bounces at netbehaviour.org] *On Behalf Of *michael 
> szpakowski
> *Sent:* Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:04 AM
> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> *Subject:* Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their 
> grip on the arts
>
> It's interesting that the original article uses theatre as a starting 
> point. Having started out in the late seventies working in the theatre 
> and keeping a toe in that camp until very recently I can vouch for the 
> change.
>
> I remember on my second job ever in 1977 I asked one of the guys in 
> the small touring company I was working for what he'd been before he 
> became an actor. "A burglar", he replied. It was true - he came from 
> a poor working class area of a big industrial town and rebelled in 
> perhaps not the most social of ways. He'd wanted out though & learned 
> to play the bass, joined a band and then got into acting through the 
> many connections and opportunities there were then ( and which were 
> not tied to expensive training). He later became quite a celebrated TV 
> performer playing a part that was related to his earlier life and 
> authentically so.
>
> Many of the people I worked with at that time came from similar 
> working class backgrounds to my own - I myself am the child of a 
> Polish refugee turned furnaceman in the Sheffield steel.
>
> Now , unless it is someone who worked their way in through the soaps, 
> working class accents are produced to order by the "skills" of the 
> largely privileged cadre who can afford to make it through drama 
> school. In the 90s I taught theatre to FE students one of whom (the 
> daughter of a classroom teacher from Essex) went to RADA, through 
> merit not connections. I went to see her rather star studded West End 
> debut ( a triumph which gave her a good deal of class satisfaction) 
> and she told me she'd spent three years at RADA playing "second 
> secretary" or similar whilst the sons and daughters of those already 
> in the "biz" or simply the well heeled and confident scooped the leads.
>
> What is the timeline? - I can tell you exactly what it is - when the 
> working class were fighting and winning in the UK, mid-sixties to 
> 74ish, miraculously there were ways for us to "better ourselves" in 
> other ways than struggle.
>
> It took awhile for these gains to be chipped away but it has been 
> downhill in proportion to the series of (often entirely unnecessary) 
> defeats that have been the outcome of workers' struggles since the 
> Winter of Discontent in the late seventies.
>
> The marginalisation of working class voices /in the arts/ is a 
> consequence of the fact that our rulers believe they have us licked 
> and under control /in general/. My greatest hope (and belief) is that 
> sometime before I shuffle off we will show them how wrong they were.
>
> michael
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> *From:*ruth catlow <ruth.catlow at furtherfield.org>
> *To:* netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> *Sent:* Sunday, September 14, 2014 1:53 PM
> *Subject:* Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their 
> grip on the arts
>
> Do we care if our arts are increasingly practiced, disseminated and 
> discussed in the media by a privileged few?
>
> Were the post-WWII gains in diversity an illusion? or did time really 
> stop, and start going backwards?
> If so when did this reversal start?
>
> Early 80s, mid 90s, early noughties?
>
>
> On 14/09/2014 11:12, marc garrett wrote:
>
> The privileged few are tightening their grip on the arts | The 
> Guardian - http://go.shr.lc/1wsoLXu <http://t.co/LqXQEQDy72>
>
> -- 
> --->
> 
> A living - breathing - thriving networked neighbourhood -
> proud of free culture - claiming it with others ;)
> 
> Other reviews,articles,interviews
> http://www.furtherfield.org/reviews.php
> 
> Furtherfield -- online arts community, platforms for creating, viewing,
> discussing and learning about experimental practices at the
> intersections of art, technology and social change.
> http://www.furtherfield.org <http://www.furtherfield.org/>
> 
> Furtherfield Gallery -- Finsbury Park (London).
> http://www.furtherfield.org/gallery
> 
> Netbehaviour - Networked Artists List Community.
> http://www.netbehaviour.org <http://www.netbehaviour.org/>
> 
> http://identi.ca/furtherfield
> http://twitter.com/furtherfield
>
>
>
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Message: 2
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:16:12 +0200
From: rinus van alebeek <injapatti at gmail.com>
To: netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org
Subject: [NetBehaviour] IS it pre-history
Message-ID:
<CADZp0JC+U9TP=OURV+mSxTEjMW5EJ7yi+4=wKyhEOVh=rwNnmA at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"

Dear Alan and all,

Long time ago Karl Popper wrote:

"For the history of power politics is nothing but the history of
international crime and mass murder (including it is true, some of the
attempts to suppress them). This history is taught in schools, and some of
the greatest criminals are extolled as heroes."

So what to do if you want to establish your own order? One starts
"cleaning" the place up. It is the way history tells. Leave it to the ghost
writer.

How to deal with this through art and other forms of expression?
I really don't have a clue. It is like pondering on how to stop the waves
of the sea rolling onto the shore.

To kill, rape, torture must give some energy, a kind of high that is
addictive and probably creates a psychological space where-in one feels
him/herself master of all events in and outside oneself.
Destroy that space is the one thing I can think of, while working on your
art.
But can we? And isn't such practice in the end self-destructive, because it
will eat your soul?

Meanwhile...

Greetings from the sunny coast of Calabria,

Rinus


-- 
web <http://rinus.zeromoon.com>

radio <http://radio-on-berlin.com>

blog <http://rinusvanalebeek.wordpress.com>
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Message: 3
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:14:26 -0400 (EDT)
From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] ISIS prehistory
Message-ID: <alpine.NEB.2.00.1409161111200.27072 at panix3.panix.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-15"; Format="flowed"



Hi - There were a lot of articles on these things a few years ago, mainly 
coming from socio-biologists and ethologists, who described a lot of 
common patterns among primate behavior. I don't have the sources and I may 
be proved wrong, but I have my doubts. Chimps were observed in what were 
described as 'nations' - large territorial groups - that fought other 
similar groups for example.

The writing on this does go back I believe at least to Konrad Lorenz.

- Alan


On Tue, 16 Sep 2014, Antye Greie-Ripatti wrote:

> morning
> 
> On Sep 16, 2014, at 2:28 AM, Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com> wrote:
>
> ?the 'human condition' - in other words there's a genetic
> component towards exclusionary behavior, territorialization,
> demonization of the other, etc.
> 
> 
> alan, do you know any scientific readings ? research on this ?
> I am really curious about that
> 
> 
>

==
email archive http://sondheim.rupamsunyata.org/
web http://www.alansondheim.org / cell 718-813-3285
music: http://www.espdisk.com/alansondheim/
current text http://www.alansondheim.org/su.txt
==

------------------------------

Message: 4
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:15:57 -0400 (EDT)
From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] ISIS prehistory
Message-ID: <alpine.NEB.2.00.1409161115030.27072 at panix3.panix.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-15"; Format="flowed"


It's interesting that the name of the group morphs - I'm not sure whether 
this is a deliberate media ploy, but it's fascinating - as if they're a 
shadow organization constantly shape-shifting.

- Alan

On Tue, 16 Sep 2014, Antye Greie-Ripatti wrote:

> Isis when Isis is the child
> of the mad policies of the West in the Middle East.?
> 
> 
> i just made a few notes in an app called swiftkey
> 
> i typed ISIS and the spell corrector changed it into USA
> 
> does that mean anything ?
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>

==
email archive http://sondheim.rupamsunyata.org/
web http://www.alansondheim.org / cell 718-813-3285
music: http://www.espdisk.com/alansondheim/
current text http://www.alansondheim.org/su.txt
==

------------------------------

Message: 5
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:22:45 -0400 (EDT)
From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
To: helen at creative-catalyst.com, NetBehaviour for networked
distributed creativity <netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] ISIS prehistory
Message-ID: <alpine.NEB.2.00.1409161116420.27072 at panix3.panix.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"; Format="flowed"



There's huge difference, and I think not seeing that is part of the 
problem. All violence isn't neo-liberal/colonialist in origin, all warfare 
isn't 'fundamentally' the same, and all aims aren't even commensurate; for 
that matter, for me, even the idea of 'origin' becomes suspect; you can 
trace local histories as far back as you like, things are much more 
tangled than they appear on the surface.

- Alan - I should apologize for the initial post - I received an email 
from a moderator at nettime who told me it was "bog-standard" behavior 
then - which it wasn't, and these discussions tend to become over-loaded.

re below - ISIS is the child of a _lot_ of things and to simplify it with 
a family model again obscures the complexity and (for me) the violence.

On Tue, 16 Sep 2014, helen varley jamieson wrote:

> :D perhaps that, fundamentally, there is little difference between the two;
> they just have different methods to achieve their aims ...
> 
> On 16/09/14 8:22 AM, Antye Greie-Ripatti wrote:
> Isis when Isis is the child
> of the mad policies of the West in the
> Middle East.?
> 
> 
> i just made a few notes in an app called swiftkey
> 
> i typed ISIS and the spell corrector changed it into USA
> 
> does that mean anything ?
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> 
> 
> 
> --
> helen varley jamieson
> helen at creative-catalyst.com
> http://www.creative-catalyst.com
> http://www.wehaveasituation.net
> http://www.upstage.org.nz
> 
>

==
email archive http://sondheim.rupamsunyata.org/
web http://www.alansondheim.org / cell 718-813-3285
music: http://www.espdisk.com/alansondheim/
current text http://www.alansondheim.org/su.txt
==

------------------------------

Message: 6
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:25:24 -0400 (EDT)
From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] IS it pre-history
Message-ID: <alpine.NEB.2.00.1409161123220.27072 at panix3.panix.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"; Format="flowed"



My soul does feel eaten, I'm serious about this. I have nightmares, heart 
palpitations (going in for a monitor today), etc. But I can't ignore it (I 
can keep my ruminations from the lists on the subject - certainly the 
response by the nettime monitor was incredibly condescending and doesn't 
do me or him or the issue any good)...

I'd love to see a show just called something like Responses to Violence 
and see what emerges -


On Tue, 16 Sep 2014, rinus van alebeek wrote:

> Dear Alan and all,
> 
> Long time ago Karl Popper wrote:
> "For the history of power politics is nothing but the history of
> international crime and mass murder?(including it is true, some of the
> attempts to suppress them). This history is taught in schools, and some of
> the greatest criminals are extolled as heroes."
> 
> So what to do if you want to establish your own order? One starts "cleaning"
> the place up. It is the way history tells. Leave it to the ghost writer.
> 
> How to deal with this through art and other forms of expression?
> I really don't have a clue. It is like pondering on how to stop the waves of
> the sea rolling onto the shore.
> 
> To kill, rape, torture must give some energy, a kind of high that is
> addictive and probably creates a psychological space where-in one feels
> him/herself master of all events in and outside oneself.
> Destroy that space is the one thing I can think of, while working on your
> art.
> But can we? And isn't such practice in the end self-destructive, because it
> will eat your soul?
> 
> Meanwhile...
> 
> Greetings from the sunny coast of Calabria,
> 
> Rinus
> 
> 
> --
> web
> radio
> 
> blog
> 
>

==
email archive http://sondheim.rupamsunyata.org/
web http://www.alansondheim.org / cell 718-813-3285
music: http://www.espdisk.com/alansondheim/
current text http://www.alansondheim.org/su.txt
==

------------------------------

Message: 7
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 11:26:48 -0400 (EDT)
From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
To: netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org
Subject: [NetBehaviour] Everyone in Love in the "Middle East" (related
but	not the same)
Message-ID: <alpine.NEB.2.00.1409161126260.27670 at panix3.panix.com>
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed



Everyone in Love in the "Middle East"

http://www.alansondheim.org/inlove0.png
http://www.alansondheim.org/inlove.mp4
http://www.alansondheim.org/inlove3.png

over heals inlove! Alan touches Alan and thinks, wow! You're
really heals inlove!", "%n kicks you? Hardly! But it's always in
hir thoughts!"}, place your legs in order, here inlovely %l!"},
{"weep", "%n weeps openly in takes refuge inlove for the analyst
in order to avoid crossing the dresses that shimmered as they
flew about. I was wonderfully inlove with that same kind of
damaging worship that When I'm inlove I gotta write better than
ever before because I wanna be. When I'm inlove her beauty smile
comes and visits in my dreams and When I'm inlove I lie all
twisted with her body curled up with nothing. I am inlove with
Language, To be inlove is to slide the world apart. 'I am inlove
with you' - in the presence of truth, truth is effaced. I am
inlove with you, unnamed. I am inlove with your obsession with
this topic. we are students inlovely school, she said. I am
inlove with your obsession with this topic! Back, we'd fucked,
fallen inlove or at least groped our way to object inlove with
itself. Speaking in video is fundamental, saying either to be
killed or inlove. Love and death meet in the word. He seems to
be inlove with his own noise. no reason for him not to do it. I
fell inlove with someone who lived.



------------------------------

Message: 8
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 12:34:12 -0300
From: Ana Vald?s <agora158 at gmail.com>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] IS it pre-history
Message-ID:
<CAFbYiEKvwqctSvdy7GmsuRAx_yNevd1W+Np+=LCqgvkQ9CMWYA at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

As I wrote before I think the exhibition and discussions initiated by
Catherine David and Jordan Crandall were among the best I read and I am
very happy I participated on them. The Israeli architect Eyal Weizman wrote
an interesting book about violence and evil
"The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to Gaza
by Eyal Weizman
Groundbreaking exploration of the philosophy underpinning Western
humanitarian intervention.
The principle of the ?lesser evil??the acceptability of pursuing one
exceptional course of action in order to prevent a greater injustice?has
long been a cornerstone of Western ethical philosophy. From its roots in
classical ethics and Christian theology, to Hannah Arendt?s exploration of
the work of the Jewish Councils during the Nazi regime, Weizman explores
its development in three key transformations of the problem: the defining
intervention of M?decins Sans Fronti?res in mid-1980s Ethiopia; the
separation wall in Israel-Palestine; and international and human rights law
in Bosnia, Gaza and Iraq. Drawing on a wealth of new research, Weizman
charts the latest manifestation of this age-old idea. In doing so he shows
how military and political intervention acquired a new ?humanitarian?
acceptability and legality in the late twentieth and early twenty-first
centuries."

He is a very interesting researcher at Goldsmiths college and his "round
table" discussions were very important to develop a kind of fusion between
philosophy, urbanism and militarism.
I wrote a short essay about him and his works "The Politics of
Verticality", about how Jewish settlers and military have taken the Israeli
and the Palestine civil societies as hostages.

http://www.netartreview.net/weeklyFeatures/Weizman_English.html

cheers
Ana and Alan, be careful with your heart, we need your compassion and your
passion! :)

On Tue, Sep 16, 2014 at 12:25 PM, Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com> wrote:

>
>
> My soul does feel eaten, I'm serious about this. I have nightmares, heart
> palpitations (going in for a monitor today), etc. But I can't ignore it (I
> can keep my ruminations from the lists on the subject - certainly the
> response by the nettime monitor was incredibly condescending and doesn't do
> me or him or the issue any good)...
>
> I'd love to see a show just called something like Responses to Violence
> and see what emerges -
>
>
>
> On Tue, 16 Sep 2014, rinus van alebeek wrote:
>
> Dear Alan and all,
>>
>> Long time ago Karl Popper wrote:
>> "For the history of power politics is nothing but the history of
>> international crime and mass murder (including it is true, some of the
>> attempts to suppress them). This history is taught in schools, and some of
>> the greatest criminals are extolled as heroes."
>>
>> So what to do if you want to establish your own order? One starts
>> "cleaning"
>> the place up. It is the way history tells. Leave it to the ghost writer.
>>
>> How to deal with this through art and other forms of expression?
>> I really don't have a clue. It is like pondering on how to stop the waves
>> of
>> the sea rolling onto the shore.
>>
>> To kill, rape, torture must give some energy, a kind of high that is
>> addictive and probably creates a psychological space where-in one feels
>> him/herself master of all events in and outside oneself.
>> Destroy that space is the one thing I can think of, while working on your
>> art.
>> But can we? And isn't such practice in the end self-destructive, because
>> it
>> will eat your soul?
>>
>> Meanwhile...
>>
>> Greetings from the sunny coast of Calabria,
>>
>> Rinus
>>
>>
>> --
>> web
>> radio
>>
>> blog
>>
>>
>>
> ==
> email archive http://sondheim.rupamsunyata.org/
> web http://www.alansondheim.org / cell 718-813-3285
> music: http://www.espdisk.com/alansondheim/
> current text http://www.alansondheim.org/su.txt
> ==
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>



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Message: 9
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:43:36 -0500
From: Patrick Lichty <pl at voyd.com>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their
grip on the arts
Message-ID: <D03DC3AF.A751%pl at voyd.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

Ruth,
This is true. While we can make magic in the back alley, we must also
champion arts in the public domain, and the current situation is untenable.
So, I see this taking many shapes, as tactical media, strong lobbying with
the government, and the leveraging of powerful NPOs/NGOs that will join the
cause.
Of course, I see FF as one of the great bastions of this in the UK.
I always stand in solidarity and am ready to nip at the heels of the
behemoth when duty calls.

From: ruth catlow <ruth.catlow at furtherfield.org>
Reply-To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Date: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 7:36 AM
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their grip on
the arts



Patrick - respect is due to you for your work and the impact of the many
tactical media artists (Yes Men, Etoy, Ubermorgen etc.) who address power
where it swaggers.

However "recognition by the money elite" currently also impacts (through
money and mass-media ties) wider access to all kinds of arts (their creation
and appreciation) by more diverse people.

It's not only about artists' working conditions, but about what kind of
society we want, and about how to provide ways for all of us to engage,
stimulate and "better ourselves" (individually and collectively). Shopping
is not enough.

We can also end up arguing the toss about whether, when we are eeking out
the last few pennies from our stricken public coffers, whether we choose to
commission an artist or pay for life saving health care. The "a luxury or a
life" argument. But this ignores the fact that austerity ideologies justify
subsidy and support to many other more well heeled sectors of society. Which
I think brings us back again to Michael's post; ) "The marginalisation of
working class voices in the arts is a consequence of the fact that our
rulers believe they have us licked and under control in general."

It's good to see a-n building up an argument from different perspectives as
part of their Paying Artists campaign.
http://www.a-n.co.uk/tag/paying-artists



On 15/09/2014 19:35, Patrick Lichty wrote:


> 
> 
> 
> Honestly, I think it just depends if you want to be recognized by money elite.
> We have been doing work that has gotten press for decades on a small budget,
> but I agree it gets tiring to do work continually that is never funded for
> decades. It leaves you a little tired and with a lot less money than you
> might have had for retirement (I mean at 90, you gits!)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> From: netbehaviour-bounces at netbehaviour.org
> [mailto:netbehaviour-bounces at netbehaviour.org] On Behalf Of michael szpakowski
> Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:04 AM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their grip on
> the arts
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> It's interesting that the original article uses theatre as a starting point.
> Having started out in the late seventies working in the theatre and keeping a
> toe in that camp until very recently I can vouch for the change.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> I remember on my second job ever in 1977 I asked one of the guys in the small
> touring company I was working for what he'd been before he became an actor. "A
> burglar", he replied. It was true - he came from a poor working class area of
> a big industrial town and rebelled in perhaps not the most social of ways.
> He'd wanted out though & learned to play the bass, joined a band and then got
> into acting through the many connections and opportunities there were then (
> and which were not tied to expensive training). He later became quite a
> celebrated TV performer playing a part that was related to his earlier life
> and authentically so.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Many of the people I worked with at that time came from similar working class
> backgrounds to my own - I myself am the child of a Polish refugee turned
> furnaceman in the Sheffield steel.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Now , unless it is someone who worked their way in through the soaps, working
> class accents are produced to order by the "skills" of the largely privileged
> cadre who can afford to make it through drama school. In the 90s I taught
> theatre to FE students one of whom (the daughter of a classroom teacher from
> Essex) went to RADA, through merit not connections. I went to see her rather
> star studded West End debut ( a triumph which gave her a good deal of class
> satisfaction) and she told me she'd spent three years at RADA playing "second
> secretary" or similar whilst the sons and daughters of those already in the
> "biz" or simply the well heeled and confident scooped the leads.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> What is the timeline? - I can tell you exactly what it is - when the working
> class were fighting and winning in the UK, mid-sixties to 74ish, miraculously
> there were ways for us to "better ourselves" in other ways than struggle.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> It took awhile for these gains to be chipped away but it has been downhill in
> proportion to the series of (often entirely unnecessary) defeats that have
> been the outcome of workers' struggles since the Winter of Discontent in the
> late seventies.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> The marginalisation of working class voices in the arts is a consequence of
> the fact that our rulers believe they have us licked and under control in
> general. My greatest hope (and belief) is that sometime before I shuffle off
> we will show them how wrong they were.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> michael
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> From: ruth catlow <ruth.catlow at furtherfield.org>
> <mailto:ruth.catlow at furtherfield.org>
> To: netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 1:53 PM
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their grip on
> the arts
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Do we care if our arts are increasingly practiced, disseminated and discussed
> in the media by a privileged few?
> 
> Were the post-WWII gains in diversity an illusion? or did time really stop,
> and start going backwards?
> If so when did this reversal start?
> 
> Early 80s, mid 90s, early noughties?
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On 14/09/2014 11:12, marc garrett wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> The privileged few are tightening their grip on the arts | The Guardian -
> http://go.shr.lc/1wsoLXu <http://t.co/LqXQEQDy72>
> 
> 
> -- 
> 
> --->
> 
> 
> 
> A living - breathing - thriving networked neighbourhood -
> 
> proud of free culture - claiming it with others ;)
> 
> 
> 
> Other reviews,articles,interviews
> 
> http://www.furtherfield.org/reviews.php
> 
> 
> 
> Furtherfield ? online arts community, platforms for creating, viewing,
> 
> discussing and learning about experimental practices at the
> 
> intersections of art, technology and social change.
> 
> http://www.furtherfield.org <http://www.furtherfield.org/>
> 
> 
> 
> Furtherfield Gallery ? Finsbury Park (London).
> 
> http://www.furtherfield.org/gallery
> 
> 
> 
> Netbehaviour - Networked Artists List Community.
> 
> http://www.netbehaviour.org <http://www.netbehaviour.org/>
> 
> 
> 
> http://identi.ca/furtherfield
> 
> http://twitter.com/furtherfield
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> 
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> 
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> 
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.orghttp://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netb
> ehaviour
> 


_______________________________________________ NetBehaviour mailing list
NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour

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Message: 10
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:48:15 +0100
From: dave miller <dave.miller.uk at gmail.com>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: [NetBehaviour] alternative truths - comic
Message-ID:
<CAAE50Rcf53gbpBGMWntxCw+5NBvar+oWwOeziUf3tj4YjPe9wQ at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

http://davemiller.org/comics/alternative_truths.png
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Message: 11
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 10:55:13 -0500
From: Patrick Lichty <pl at voyd.com>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their
grip on the arts
Message-ID: <D03DC69B.A762%pl at voyd.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

And, I also agree that the argument of "Why fund the arts and space missions
when we need to 'xxx' at home."
This is a ridiculous proposition, as these supposedly "luxury" expenditures
on a governmental scale actually want to be controlled by private foundation
which give significantly less, and the derivative payoff from public
initiatives like the ones above are usually massive, if sometimes indirect.
The culture of accountability is horrid and stifling.

From: temp <pl at voyd.com>
Reply-To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Date: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 10:43 AM
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their grip on
the arts

Ruth,
This is true. While we can make magic in the back alley, we must also
champion arts in the public domain, and the current situation is untenable.
So, I see this taking many shapes, as tactical media, strong lobbying with
the government, and the leveraging of powerful NPOs/NGOs that will join the
cause.
Of course, I see FF as one of the great bastions of this in the UK.
I always stand in solidarity and am ready to nip at the heels of the
behemoth when duty calls.

From: ruth catlow <ruth.catlow at furtherfield.org>
Reply-To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Date: Tuesday, September 16, 2014 7:36 AM
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their grip on
the arts



Patrick - respect is due to you for your work and the impact of the many
tactical media artists (Yes Men, Etoy, Ubermorgen etc.) who address power
where it swaggers.

However "recognition by the money elite" currently also impacts (through
money and mass-media ties) wider access to all kinds of arts (their creation
and appreciation) by more diverse people.

It's not only about artists' working conditions, but about what kind of
society we want, and about how to provide ways for all of us to engage,
stimulate and "better ourselves" (individually and collectively). Shopping
is not enough.

We can also end up arguing the toss about whether, when we are eeking out
the last few pennies from our stricken public coffers, whether we choose to
commission an artist or pay for life saving health care. The "a luxury or a
life" argument. But this ignores the fact that austerity ideologies justify
subsidy and support to many other more well heeled sectors of society. Which
I think brings us back again to Michael's post; ) "The marginalisation of
working class voices in the arts is a consequence of the fact that our
rulers believe they have us licked and under control in general."

It's good to see a-n building up an argument from different perspectives as
part of their Paying Artists campaign.
http://www.a-n.co.uk/tag/paying-artists



On 15/09/2014 19:35, Patrick Lichty wrote:


> 
> 
> 
> Honestly, I think it just depends if you want to be recognized by money elite.
> We have been doing work that has gotten press for decades on a small budget,
> but I agree it gets tiring to do work continually that is never funded for
> decades. It leaves you a little tired and with a lot less money than you
> might have had for retirement (I mean at 90, you gits!)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> From: netbehaviour-bounces at netbehaviour.org
> [mailto:netbehaviour-bounces at netbehaviour.org] On Behalf Of michael szpakowski
> Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:04 AM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their grip on
> the arts
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> It's interesting that the original article uses theatre as a starting point.
> Having started out in the late seventies working in the theatre and keeping a
> toe in that camp until very recently I can vouch for the change.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> I remember on my second job ever in 1977 I asked one of the guys in the small
> touring company I was working for what he'd been before he became an actor. "A
> burglar", he replied. It was true - he came from a poor working
> class area of a big industrial town and rebelled in perhaps not the most
> social of ways. He'd wanted out though & learned to play the bass, joined a
> band and then got into acting through the many connections and opportunities
> there were then ( and which were not tied to expensive training). He later
> became quite a celebrated TV performer playing a part that was related to his
> earlier life and authentically so.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Many of the people I worked with at that time came from similar working class
> backgrounds to my own - I myself am the child of a Polish refugee turned
> furnaceman in the Sheffield steel.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Now , unless it is someone who worked their way in through the soaps, working
> class accents are produced to order by the "skills" of the largely privileged
> cadre who can afford to make it through drama school. In the 90s I taught
> theatre to FE students one of whom (the daughter of a classroom teacher from
> Essex) went to RADA, through merit not connections. I went to see her rather
> star studded West End debut ( a triumph which gave her a good deal of class
> satisfaction) and she told me she'd spent three years at RADA playing "second
> secretary" or similar whilst the sons and daughters of those already in the
> "biz" or simply the well heeled and confident scooped the leads.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> What is the timeline? - I can tell you exactly what it is - when the working
> class were fighting and winning in the UK, mid-sixties to 74ish, miraculously
> there were ways for us to "better ourselves" in other ways than struggle.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> It took awhile for these gains to be chipped away but it has been downhill in
> proportion to the series of (often entirely unnecessary) defeats that have
> been the outcome of workers' struggles since the Winter of Discontent in the
> late seventies.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> The marginalisation of working class voices in the arts is a consequence of
> the fact that our rulers believe they have us licked and under control in
> general. My greatest hope (and belief) is that sometime before I shuffle off
> we will show them how wrong they were.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> michael
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> From: ruth catlow <ruth.catlow at furtherfield.org>
> <mailto:ruth.catlow at furtherfield.org>
> To: netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> Sent: Sunday, September 14, 2014 1:53 PM
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] The privileged few are tightening their grip on
> the arts
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Do we care if our arts are increasingly practiced, disseminated and discussed
> in the media by a privileged few?
> 
> Were the post-WWII gains in diversity an illusion? or did time really stop,
> and start going backwards?
> If so when did this reversal start?
> 
> Early 80s, mid 90s, early noughties?
> 
> 
> 
> 
> On 14/09/2014 11:12, marc garrett wrote:
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> The privileged few are tightening their grip on the arts | The Guardian -
> http://go.shr.lc/1wsoLXu <http://t.co/LqXQEQDy72>
> 
> 
> -- 
> 
> --->
> 
> 
> 
> A living - breathing - thriving networked neighbourhood -
> 
> proud of free culture - claiming it with others ;)
> 
> 
> 
> Other reviews,articles,interviews
> 
> http://www.furtherfield.org/reviews.php
> 
> 
> 
> Furtherfield ? online arts community, platforms for creating, viewing,
> 
> discussing and learning about experimental practices at the
> 
> intersections of art, technology and social change.
> 
> http://www.furtherfield.org <http://www.furtherfield.org/>
> 
> 
> 
> Furtherfield Gallery ? Finsbury Park (London).
> 
> http://www.furtherfield.org/gallery
> 
> 
> 
> Netbehaviour - Networked Artists List Community.
> 
> http://www.netbehaviour.org <http://www.netbehaviour.org/>
> 
> 
> 
> http://identi.ca/furtherfield
> 
> http://twitter.com/furtherfield
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> 
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> 
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> 
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.orghttp://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netb
> ehaviour
> 


_______________________________________________ NetBehaviour mailing list
NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.orghttp://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/ne
tbehaviour
_______________________________________________ NetBehaviour mailing list
NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour

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Message: 12
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 09:18:03 -0700
From: Joel Weishaus <joelweishaus at gmail.com>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] IS it pre-history
Message-ID: <541862BB.7040303 at gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"; Format="flowed"

Ana;

Thank you for this.
It's an example of how artists can supply insight.

Best,
Joel


On 9/16/2014 8:34 AM, Ana Vald?s wrote:
> As I wrote before I think the exhibition and discussions initiated by 
> Catherine David and Jordan Crandall were among the best I read and I 
> am very happy I participated on them. The Israeli architect Eyal 
> Weizman wrote an interesting book about violence and evil
> "The Least of All Possible Evils: Humanitarian Violence from Arendt to 
> Gaza
> by Eyal Weizman
> Groundbreaking exploration of the philosophy underpinning Western 
> humanitarian intervention.
> The principle of the "lesser evil"---the acceptability of pursuing one 
> exceptional course of action in order to prevent a greater 
> injustice---has long been a cornerstone of Western ethical philosophy. 
> From its roots in classical ethics and Christian theology, to Hannah 
> Arendt's exploration of the work of the Jewish Councils during the 
> Nazi regime, Weizman explores its development in three key 
> transformations of the problem: the defining intervention of M?decins 
> Sans Fronti?res in mid-1980s Ethiopia; the separation wall in 
> Israel-Palestine; and international and human rights law in Bosnia, 
> Gaza and Iraq. Drawing on a wealth of new research, Weizman charts the 
> latest manifestation of this age-old idea. In doing so he shows how 
> military and political intervention acquired a new "humanitarian" 
> acceptability and legality in the late twentieth and early 
> twenty-first centuries."
>
> He is a very interesting researcher at Goldsmiths college and his 
> "round table" discussions were very important to develop a kind of 
> fusion between philosophy, urbanism and militarism.
> I wrote a short essay about him and his works "The Politics of 
> Verticality", about how Jewish settlers and military have taken the 
> Israeli and the Palestine civil societies as hostages.
>
> http://www.netartreview.net/weeklyFeatures/Weizman_English.html
>
> cheers
> Ana and Alan, be careful with your heart, we need your compassion and 
> your passion! :)
>
> On Tue, Sep 16, 2014 at 12:25 PM, Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com 
> <mailto:sondheim at panix.com>> wrote:
>
>
>
> My soul does feel eaten, I'm serious about this. I have
> nightmares, heart palpitations (going in for a monitor today),
> etc. But I can't ignore it (I can keep my ruminations from the
> lists on the subject - certainly the response by the nettime
> monitor was incredibly condescending and doesn't do me or him or
> the issue any good)...
>
> I'd love to see a show just called something like Responses to
> Violence and see what emerges -
>
>
>
> On Tue, 16 Sep 2014, rinus van alebeek wrote:
>
> Dear Alan and all,
>
> Long time ago Karl Popper wrote:
> "For the history of power politics is nothing but the history of
> international crime and mass murder (including it is true,
> some of the
> attempts to suppress them). This history is taught in schools,
> and some of
> the greatest criminals are extolled as heroes."
>
> So what to do if you want to establish your own order? One
> starts "cleaning"
> the place up. It is the way history tells. Leave it to the
> ghost writer.
>
> How to deal with this through art and other forms of expression?
> I really don't have a clue. It is like pondering on how to
> stop the waves of
> the sea rolling onto the shore.
>
> To kill, rape, torture must give some energy, a kind of high
> that is
> addictive and probably creates a psychological space where-in
> one feels
> him/herself master of all events in and outside oneself.
> Destroy that space is the one thing I can think of, while
> working on your
> art.
> But can we? And isn't such practice in the end
> self-destructive, because it
> will eat your soul?
>
> Meanwhile...
>
> Greetings from the sunny coast of Calabria,
>
> Rinus
>
>
> --
> web
> radio
>
> blog
>
>
>
> ==
> email archive http://sondheim.rupamsunyata.org/
> web http://www.alansondheim.org / cell 718-813-3285
> music: http://www.espdisk.com/alansondheim/
> current text http://www.alansondheim.org/su.txt
> ==
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org <mailto:NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>
>
>
>
> -- 
> http://www.twitter.com/caravia15860606060
> http://www.scoop.it/t/art-and-activism/
> http://www.scoop.it/t/food-history-and-trivia
> http://www.scoop.it/t/urbanism-3-0
>
>
>
> cell Sweden +4670-3213370
> cell Uruguay +598-99470758
>
>
> "When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth 
> with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you 
> will always long to return.
> --- Leonardo da Vinci
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour


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Message: 13
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 17:42:07 +0100
From: James Morris <james at jwm-art.net>
To: netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] ISIS prehistory
Message-ID: <1410885727.553.1.camel at jwm-art.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="UTF-8"

On Mon, 2014-09-15 at 19:28 -0400, Alan Sondheim wrote:
> Thanks and no problem; I'm really sensitive about this.
> 
> Where I might disagree, I think ISIS is the child of ISIS; I think blaming 
> colonialism for everything might be another form of colonization - that 
> is, these people are driven by force of the Other, not their own destiny, 
> their own choice - while we're given the 'luxury' of choice and destiny. 
> ISIS is cruel on their own terms, and those terms go all the way back 
> before the Crusades. I think as well that this is also unfortunately the 
> 'human condition' - in other words there's a genetic component towards 
> exclusionary behavior, territorialization, demonization of the other, etc. 
> Chimps also have warfare; even sea anenomes do. So for me the question is 
> how do we avoid these horrors - which has to go beyond geopolitics; 
> geopolitics will always be with us, moreso as species head towards 
> extinction and the planet approaches its carrying-capacity of life.
> 

And we need to defend ourselves against hostile extra terrestrial
forces, because we won't know for sure whether such forces exist or not
until they either attack us or we're technologically advanced enough to
actually rule out the idea of attack from hostile extra terrestrial
forces.

James.





------------------------------

Message: 14
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 12:32:04 -0700
From: Joel Weishaus <joelweishaus at gmail.com>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] ISIS prehistory
Message-ID: <54189034.2060600 at gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"; Format="flowed"


At bottom, ISIS comes from a feeling of powerlessness, even by those 
who/look/ powerful.
It's just the newest catchy acronym. When the media gets tired of one, 
another will pop-up.
One is more violent than the last, just as one film is more violent than 
the one before.
We're dealing with the same sickness that makes billionaires not being 
able to stop wanting more.
The same unfathomable emptiness inside.

-Joel.




On 9/16/2014 9:42 AM, James Morris wrote:
> On Mon, 2014-09-15 at 19:28 -0400, Alan Sondheim wrote:
>> Thanks and no problem; I'm really sensitive about this.
>>
>> Where I might disagree, I think ISIS is the child of ISIS; I think blaming
>> colonialism for everything might be another form of colonization - that
>> is, these people are driven by force of the Other, not their own destiny,
>> their own choice - while we're given the 'luxury' of choice and destiny.
>> ISIS is cruel on their own terms, and those terms go all the way back
>> before the Crusades. I think as well that this is also unfortunately the
>> 'human condition' - in other words there's a genetic component towards
>> exclusionary behavior, territorialization, demonization of the other, etc.
>> Chimps also have warfare; even sea anenomes do. So for me the question is
>> how do we avoid these horrors - which has to go beyond geopolitics;
>> geopolitics will always be with us, moreso as species head towards
>> extinction and the planet approaches its carrying-capacity of life.
>>
> And we need to defend ourselves against hostile extra terrestrial
> forces, because we won't know for sure whether such forces exist or not
> until they either attack us or we're technologically advanced enough to
> actually rule out the idea of attack from hostile extra terrestrial
> forces.
>
> James.
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour


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Message: 15
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 16:36:20 -0300
From: Ana Vald?s <agora158 at gmail.com>
To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
<netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>
Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] ISIS prehistory
Message-ID:
<CAFbYiELGxYCFiyNj2dq779K=j5mRq1atPzVHH1TAkmF_LVokng at mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"

And the beheading are frightening, they come to close to you. In the
opposite the clusters of civilians killled by the US drones in Pakistan
don't seem real at all.
The media is the message, Luhan dixit :)
Ana

On Tue, Sep 16, 2014 at 4:32 PM, Joel Weishaus <joelweishaus at gmail.com>
wrote:

>
> At bottom, ISIS comes from a feeling of powerlessness, even by those who*
> look* powerful.
> It's just the newest catchy acronym. When the media gets tired of one,
> another will pop-up.
> One is more violent than the last, just as one film is more violent than
> the one before.
> We're dealing with the same sickness that makes billionaires not being
> able to stop wanting more.
> The same unfathomable emptiness inside.
>
> -Joel.
>
>
>
>
> On 9/16/2014 9:42 AM, James Morris wrote:
>
> On Mon, 2014-09-15 at 19:28 -0400, Alan Sondheim wrote:
>
> Thanks and no problem; I'm really sensitive about this.
>
> Where I might disagree, I think ISIS is the child of ISIS; I think blaming
> colonialism for everything might be another form of colonization - that
> is, these people are driven by force of the Other, not their own destiny,
> their own choice - while we're given the 'luxury' of choice and destiny.
> ISIS is cruel on their own terms, and those terms go all the way back
> before the Crusades. I think as well that this is also unfortunately the
> 'human condition' - in other words there's a genetic component towards
> exclusionary behavior, territorialization, demonization of the other, etc.
> Chimps also have warfare; even sea anenomes do. So for me the question is
> how do we avoid these horrors - which has to go beyond geopolitics;
> geopolitics will always be with us, moreso as species head towards
> extinction and the planet approaches its carrying-capacity of life.
>
>
> And we need to defend ourselves against hostile extra terrestrial
> forces, because we won't know for sure whether such forces exist or not
> until they either attack us or we're technologically advanced enough to
> actually rule out the idea of attack from hostile extra terrestrial
> forces.
>
> James.
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing listNetBehaviour at netbehaviour.orghttp://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>



-- 
http://www.twitter.com/caravia15860606060
http://www.scoop.it/t/art-and-activism/
http://www.scoop.it/t/food-history-and-trivia
http://www.scoop.it/t/urbanism-3-0

<http://www.scoop.it/t/postcolonial-mind/>

cell Sweden +4670-3213370
cell Uruguay +598-99470758


"When once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the earth with
your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been and there you will always
long to return.
? Leonardo da Vinci
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Message: 16
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2014 19:30:54 -0400 (EDT)
From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
To: netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org
Subject: [NetBehaviour] Qinq
Message-ID: <alpine.NEB.2.00.1409161930460.25545 at panix2.panix.com>
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed



Qinq

http://www.alansondheim.org/milkweed13.jpg
http://www.alansondheim.org/qinq1.mp3
http://www.alansondheim.org/qinq2.mp3
http://www.alansondheim.org/qinq3.mp3
http://www.alansondheim.org/milkweed03.jpg
http://www.alansondheim.org/milkweed14.jpg

flight of the demons, you feel every sound on earth
inhabits the wood, wooden frame, the strings ring with them,
sounds, demona viols and balalaikas

but it's the qin dreaming the octaves and harmonics, the qin
sounding the elaborations of warnings, musings of consolations,
palms




------------------------------

Message: 17
Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2014 14:08:24 +0930
From: Simon Biggs <simon at littlepig.org.uk>
To: Creative Interdisciplinary Research into Collaborative
Environments <CIRCLE at JISCMAIL.AC.UK>, "PIRATE at JISCMAIL.AC.UK"
<PIRATE at JISCMAIL.AC.UK>, NetBehaviour for networked distributed
creativity <netbehaviour at netbehaviour.org>,
"elitineurope at googlegroups.com" <elitineurope at googlegroups.com>,
E-POETRY-LIST at LISTSERV.BUFFALO.EDU, "PARIP at JISCMAIL.AC.UK"
<PARIP at JISCMAIL.AC.UK>
Subject: [NetBehaviour] Fwd: ELO 2015 in Bergen - The End(s) of
Electronic	Literature - Call for Participation
Message-ID: <BC8EF9D3-76B4-415F-98C1-9AA98254D3D6 at littlepig.org.uk>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"



Begin forwarded message:
> 
> CALL FOR CONTRIBUTIONS
> 
> ELO 2015 CONFERENCE - BERGEN, NORWAY
> 
> THE END(S) OF ELECTRONIC LITERATURE
> 
> The 2015 Electronic Literature Organization conference and festival will take place August 5-7th 2015. The conference website is at: http://conference.eliterature.org. The conference will be hosted by the Bergen Electronic Literature research group at the University of Bergen, Norway with sessions at venues including the University of Bergen, Det Akademiske Kvarteret, the Bergen Public Library, the University of Bergen Arts library, and local arts venues. Bergen is Norway's second-largest city, known as the gateway to the fjords, a festival city and cultural center with a lively and innovative arts scene. 
> 
> 
> DEADLINES
> 
> The deadline for submissions of research, workshop, and arts proposals is December 15, 2014.
> 
> 
> CONFERENCE THEME
> 
> The theme of the 2015 Electronic Literature Organization conference and festival is ?The End(s) of Electronic Literature.? This theme plays on several different meanings of ?ends.? Topics the conference papers and works will explore include:
> 
> Is ?electronic literature? a transitional term that will become obsolete as literary uses of computational media and devices become ubiquitous? If so, what comes after electronic literature?
> 
> We can also question in what sense electronic literature and digital writing practices are a means to an end. If so, what are the ends of electronic literature? What political, ideological, aesthetic, and commercial ends or purposes do works of electronic literature serve?
> 
> In recent years, projects such as the ELMCIP Electronic Literature Knowledge Base have sought to highlight the work of scholars and artists who have worked outside of the mainstream of electronic literature as it has developed as a field, for instance developing research collections based on Russian and Brazilian electronic literature. This conference will seek to shed further light on international communities and practices in electronic literature that have not been widely addressed in the critical literature of the field, those that are located at the ?ends? or margins of critical discourse in the field.
> 
> Electronic literature is situated as an intermedial field of practice, between literature, computation, visual and performance art. The conference will seek to develop a better understanding of electronic literature?s boundaries and relations with other academic disciplines and artistic practices.
> 
> As a laboratory for future literary forms, the field of electronic literature must count the youngest readers among its most significant group of end-users. One strand of this conference will focus specifically on digital reading experiences made for children.
> 
> 
> RESEARCH PROGRAM
> 
> For the conference research program we welcome contributions that address the conference themes. Most proposals will likely describe a scholarly presentation suitable for delivery in about 20 minutes, with time for questions. However we also welcome propsals for other forms of talks. At the time of proposal submission, authors will asked identify one of following presentation formats:
> 
> Paper (20 minute presentation): a presentation of a single by one or more paper by one or more authors (500 word abstract)
> 
> Panel (75 minutes): a proposal for a complete panel including separate papers on the same general topic (250 word overview plus 3-4 500 word abstracts).
> 
> Roundtable (1 hour): a group presentation of a particular topic emphasizing free-flowing discussion and audience interaction (500 word abstract).
> 
> Lightning talk (5 minutes): a short paper for a session focused on the question ?What comes after electronic literature?? (250 word abstract).
> 
> Proposers must attend the conference. Speakers may not present in more than two sessions.
> 
> Presentations may include elements of demonstration or performance, as part of a discussion that goes beyond the work itself. With this stipulation, proposers are welcome to address their own work.
> 
> Submissions for the research program will be accepted from September 15th-December 15th, 2014 on Easychair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=elo2015
> 
> Proposals will be peer-reviewed by the Research Program Committee. Papers will be accepted on the basis of abstracts. Although we will not require, we will encourage authors of papers accepted for the conference to make full-text versions of their papers available on the conference site prior to the conference. Authors of selected full paper submissions may be invited to contribute to a book or special issue of a journal to be published shortly after the conference. This publication opportunity will not be available to authors who do not upload their full-text papers.
> 
> 
> WORKSHOP PROGRAM
> 
> We welcome proposals for pre-conference workshops to take place on Tuesday, August 4th at the University of Bergen. 
> 
> Workshop sessions are focused on hands-on group work on a given project. For instance, working with a particular platform to learn how to use it to create works of e-lit, documenting work in a given database, sharing pedagogical models, curating electronic literature, etc. Workshops sessions are generally half-day (3 hour) or full-day (6 hour) sessions.
> 
> Proposals will be reviewed by the Workshop Program Committee and selected on the basis of their value to the e-lit community and available facilities to accommodate them.
> 
> Submissions for the workshop program will be accepted from September 15th-December 15th, 2014 on Easychair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=elo2015
> 
> 
> ARTS PROGRAM
> 
> The Arts Program provides an occasion for juried review, and extended display, performance, and presentation, of original works. 
> 
> The Committee especially welcomes submissions from artists who are new to electronic literature or who are in the beginning stages of their e-literary artistic production.
> 
> The Arts program will feature several exhibitions and a performance program that coheres with the conference themes. Please submit your proposals by Dec. 15th, 2014 via Easychair: LINK . Submissions are being accepted for the following parts of the exhibition and performance program:
> 
> Hybridity and Synesthesia: Beyond Peripheries of Form and Consciousness
> This aspect of the program will emphasize works, particularly installations, that push at the edges of literature and other forms, and that appeal to other aspects of the sensorium than those we typically associate with reading. Works for example that involve haptic sensation, touch-based interactivity, innovative audio elements, interactive images, or locative technologies.
> 
> Interventions: Engaging the Body Politic
> This exhibition will feature works that engage with contemporary cultural discourse and political reality, challenging audiences to consider digital artifacts and practices that reflect and intervene in matters of the environment, social justice, and our relation to the habitus.
> 
> Decentering: Global Electronic Literature
> While there are strong centers of activity in electronic literature in North America and Western Europe, innovations in digital textuality are also taking place in Eastern Europe and in the Southern hemisphere. This exhibition will focus on these lesser-known phenomena.
> 
> Screening Room: E-Lit Film Festival
> The first ELO film festival will feature films that have been produced recently about electronic literature and related practices, and will also include screenings of types of digital literature that benefit from sustained watching, such as poetry generators and kinetic poetry.
> 
> End(s) of Electronic Literature Performances and Readings
> This aspect of the program will feature live readings and performances of works of electronic literature. Authors are encouraged to think broadly about modes of performance, ranging from traditional readings to more theatrical styles of presentation, and to consider opportunities for site-specific interventions in public space.
> 
> Submissions for above parts of the Arts program will be accepted from September 15th-December 15th on Easychair: https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=elo2015
> 
> ELC3 Preview Exhibition
> Volume 1 (2006) and Volume 2 (2011) of the Electronic Literature Collection have been influential anthologies that helped shape the field. Volume 3 (2016) is now open for submissions. This exhibition will feature selected works from the latest instantiation of this important publication. The editors of ELC3 will curate this selection. To submit work for the ELC3, see: http://eliterature.org/2014/08/announcing-the-elc3 (ELC3 submission deadline Nov. 5, 2014)
> 
> Selections will be made via a two-step jury review process. Members of the arts program committee will first review submissions, and then curators for each track of the program will select works from among those ranked most positively by the committee. Final selections will depend on available resources and constraints of individual venues.
> 
> 
> ORGANIZATION
> 
> Conference Chair: Scott Rettberg
> 
> Research Program Chair: Jill Walker Rettberg
> 
> Arts Program Chair: Roderick Coover
> 
> Research Program Committee: Espen Aarseth, Daniel Apollon, Sandy Baldwin, Laura Borras Castanyer, Yra van Dijk, Maria Engberg, Nina Goga, Dene Grigar, Davin Heckman, Raine Koskimaa, Nick Montfort, S?ren Pold, ?yvind Prytz, Hans Kristian Rustad, Jessica Pressman, Eric Dean Rasmussen, Scott Rettberg, Alexandra Saemmer, and Joseph Tabbi.
> 
> Workshop Program Committee: Deena Larsen, Marjorie C. Luesebrink, and Patricia Tomaszek.
> 
> Arts Program Committee: Simon Biggs, Philippe Bootz, Serge Bouchardon, Kathi Inman Berens, JR Carpenter, Roderick Coover, Mark Daniels, Anne Marthe Dyvi, Natalia Fedorova, Chris Funkhouser, Dene Grigar, Claudia Kozak, Talan Memmott, Maria Mencia, Judd Morrissey, Scott Rettberg, Stephanie Strickland, Rui Torres, Michelle Teran, and Jeremy Welsh.
> 
> 
> PLEASE CIRCULATE
> 
> If you know of friends, colleagues, or organizations not aware of ELO or this conference, please feel free to circulate this Call. A PDF version is available.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 


Simon Biggs
simon at littlepig.org.uk | @_simonbiggs_ 
http://www.littlepig.org.uk | http://amazon.com/author/simonbiggs

simon.biggs at unisa.edu.au | Professor of Art, University of South Australia
http://www.unisanet.unisa.edu.au/staff/homepage.asp?name=simon.biggs

s.biggs at ed.ac.uk | Honorary Professor, Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh
http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/edinburgh-college-art/school-of-art/staff/staff?person_id=182&cw_xml=profile.php

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