[NetBehaviour] aesthetics examples ... forked from : Re: Accelerationist aesthetics

Pall Thayer pallthay at gmail.com
Sun Apr 24 20:18:54 CEST 2016


Based on my understanding of Accelerationism, I would think that the ideal
"Accelerationist" artwork would be work that you get typical art-investors
to pay a shit-load of money for but that is inherently ephemeral so that no
portion of the original "investment" can ever grow or even be recouped.

On Sun, Apr 24, 2016 at 1:24 PM ruth catlow <ruth.catlow at furtherfield.org>
wrote:

> Yes Annie,
>
>  > Ok let's discuss concrete art works, activities etc - let's leave for
> a moment the theorethical philipoli stuff
>
> More examples would be good.
>
>  > In this discussion we have until now Ruth's work
> http://gtp.ruthcatlow.net/ on time: human time, life time, computertime,
> scientific time, stone time and Rob's examples in his article
> http://furtherfield.org/features/articles/accelerationist-art  - what
> are these doing, what duscussion, thoughts they further ...
>  >
>
> To answer your particular questions about my work....
>
>  > I just watched Ruth's work again, I like the reflexion it brings, how
> it articulates all these times.
>  > I have a question: - What do the people who go to the installation
> get from this, is there a live video projection?, Can they understand
> how time is at stake in this work? (In the catalogue text I read Edward
> mentioned a projection, but so far I didn't see any photos of it)*
>  > I admit I had difficulties understanding the complexity of the piece
> in the beginning but now, at the end I can enjoy it's beauty.
>  > So probably what I want to know Ruth, is where was your focus on the
> final video object or on what happened in the installation ...
>
> I think/hope that the work is totally explicit for gallery visitors.
> But now I understand that the documentation needs more clarity for
> online viewers
>
> The plasma screen displays this webpage http://gtp.ruthcatlow.net/ which
> shows the most recent image taken by the web cam, along with the looping
> video to which images are added every 3 or 4 images.
>
> People can pose for the web cam, or might be caught looking at the video
> in which they are soon to be portrayed.
>
> Here is a photo which shows the set up.
>
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/60673926@N02/24540097322/in/album-72157663958436545/
> Here you can scroll through a set of images showing selected stills from
> the video, as well as some installation shots
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/60673926@N02/albums/72157663958436545
>
>
>  >
>  > What did I get out of the examples Rob gave in his article? They are
> almost all art, just art, as far as I can see. Objects, you can show and
> sell. They function mostly in the Artworld. Holly Herndon and probably
> also Morehshin Allahyari & Daniel Rourke seem to be a bit different in
> the sense that they also engage with other domains and feel "whole".
> They reach out.
>  > As feel "whole" for me someone like Hito Steyerl whose work I like a
> lot.
>  >
>
> http://www.e-flux.com/journal/a-sea-of-data-apophenia-and-pattern-mis-recognition/
>  > the dissappearance of an horizon - acceleration as stasis
> https://vimeo.com/81109235#t=99s
>  > Does this have anything to do with accelerationism? I don't know and
> would that be important to know?
>
> Acceleration as stasis. Yes I think this is right Annie.
>
> Yes! more examples
>
> Thank you
>
> :)
> Ruth
>
>
>  >
>  > Please diversify examples ...
>  >
>  > Thanks for these discussions!!!!!!
>  > Annie
>  >
>  > *I found a photo of a screen showing what?
> https://www.flickr.com/photos/szpako/24284339460/in/pool-wana2021/ a
> still, a looping video?
>  >
>  >
>  >
>  > On Sun, Apr 24, 2016 at 3:33 AM, Gretta Louw
> <gretta.elise.louw at gmail.com> wrote:
>  >
>  >     This makes so much sense to me, thank you Ruth. I see so much of
> this in Europe, North America and the western, urban mainstream; an
> utter inability (and, probably, unwillingness) to look outside our own
> narrowly defined cultural lens when purportedly studying/attempting to
> understand technology, media, digitalisation, and their impacts. It
> hampers real discussion and cross-fertilization of ideas. Preaching to
> the (mostly white, educated, urban, western, northern) choir - as most
> tech/ digital/ futurist and possibly accelerationist (I hope I'm wrong
> about the last one, still too early to tell)
> festivals/meetings/discussion do - is a futile endeavor and exhausting
> to watch. Diversification is essential, but the way the discourse has
> developed around diversity actually is counterproductive to achieving
> greater diversity. Just as an example, there are studies that have shown
> that reminding applicants of their 'diverse' (one must ask, according to
> whom, diverse from what??) background in a job ad by specifically
> stating that one is an equal opportunities employer etc, will in fact
> reduce the number of applicants from diverse backgrounds.
>  >
>  >     I am rambling, but this issue is always tacked on to the
> sidelines of debates around the pressing issues of our time; an
> afterthought or a nod to political correctness. It needs to be at the
> core: we should not discuss these issues unless we have sufficiently
> broad input, otherwise we are just talking ourselves into
> insignificance. NB: I am talking generally and from some disappointing
> experiences at European 'digital futures'-type round tables and panels,
> not about netbehaviourists. I do think that we all need to take a much
> more radical approach to inclusivity though. Let's not participate in
> mutual back-slapping or hand-wringing with ppl only from our own
> sub-cultures...
>  >
>  >     All the best to everyone, and thank you for sharing your thoughts.
> xx
>  >
>  >     > On 23 Apr 2016, at 21:54, ruth catlow
> <ruth.catlow at furtherfield.org> wrote:
>  >     >
>  >     > Here Baruch Gottlieb reviews “Inventing the Future”by Srnicek &
> Williams  (co-authors of the Accelerationst Manifesto)
>  >     >
>
> https://blog.p2pfoundation.net/inventing-future-beholden-present-review/2016/04/08
>  >     >
>  >     > He says
>  >     >
>  >     > "visions or projects for teleportation, nano-surgery and
> socialist Mars colonies, are not going to convince capitalists to stop
> attacking socially produced value every way they can. We need more
> fundamental knowledge about how the present is reproduced in this first
> place, the legacy of colonialism, imperialism, patriarchy and slavery in
> the very devices we use to understand such things, and we need social
> and cultural technologies to integrate that consciousness into new
> behaviours, new sociabilities, new modes of exchange."
>  >     >
>  >     >
>  >     >> On 23/04/16 13:15, ruth catlow wrote:
>  >     >> So is this the accelerationist aesthetics question?
>  >     >>
>  >     >> Q. How can we as artists and people use the logics & tools of
> automation and markets as part of making better art and better life for
> us all?
>  >     >>
>  >     >> : )
>  >     > Tom said
>  >     >>
>  >     >>>>> when it appeared that the prognostications of the first wave
> of
>  >     >> accelerationists had partly came true: namely, that the
> accelerations
>  >     >> inherent in capitalism, specifically the tendency to mobilize
> more
>  >     >> surplus labour and resources at greater rates of efficiency and
>  >     >> abstraction, would exacerbate the system's inherent
> contradictions to a
>  >     >> catastrophic point. Only partly came true though: the system
> did not
>  >     >> collapse but massively reorganized itself (all those would-be
> John Galts
>  >     >> suddenly all too happy to accept government bail-outs, massive
>  >     >> expropriation of assets from the poor). This required a
> recalibration of
>  >     >> the theses of that first wave of accelerationists, a
> recalibration that
>  >     >> perhaps either is reflected in art, or in which<<<
>  >     >>
>  >     >> The unfettered development of automation and market-forces is
> currently seen as the preserve of people on the political right (who
> seek to preserve the status quo or enhance their wealth and power). But
> who may at some points ask for time-out (and bail-outs) in order to
> re-set their position of advantage.
>  >     >>
>  >     >> Rob said
>  >     >>
>  >     >> If I was trolling I'd argue that if you're on the left you're
> either a
>  >     >> conscious or an unconscious accelerationist. But it's possible
> to do
>  >     >> things in an un-Accelerationist way - it's not an inescapable or
>  >     >> inevitable cultural condition.
>  >     >>
>  >     >> Yes, this is why I declared myself an Accelerationist- it was
> not a proud declamation (a la 'I'm a feminist and I'm proud') more an
> admission (a la, the declaration at meetings of people participating in
> the 12 step programme).
>  >     >>
>  >     >> What I think is worth reflecting on (even if only idly) in this
>  >     >> discussion is whether there is anything in one's own life or
> work that
>  >     >> this strategy would be productive for. What could each of us
> better
>  >     >> understand and reason about (in some sense) so as to be able
> to better
>  >     >> change it?
>  >     >>
>  >     >> Both these points indicate something that Left Accelerationism
> has been
>  >     >> criticised for from various angles - it is a *selective*
> acceleration.
>  >     >>
>  >     >>
>  >     >> Left Accelerationists are critiqued as these
> social-power-tools (of automation and market-forces) are seen as
> inherently dehumanising and destructive of solidarity and freedom?
>  >     >>
>  >     >>
>  >     >>
>  >     >>
>  >     >>> On 23/04/16 02:49, Rob Myers wrote:
>  >     >>>> On 22/04/16 03:27 AM, ruth catlow wrote:
>  >     >>>> Not that we all need to be in an unending frenzy of
> communication and
>  >     >>>> exchange. More that we have ever-more nuanced ways to sense the
>  >     >>>> significance of different kinds of participation: in a loop
> of unwitting
>  >     >>>> participation and active collaboration and organisation.
>  >     >>> I think this (and Simon & Pall's conversation) raises two
> important
>  >     >>> points about "Accelerationism".
>  >     >>>
>  >     >>> The first is that contemporary society appears to have speeded
> up
>  >     >>> anyway. We can debate whether progress or the economy has
> stalled, but
>  >     >>> our experience of life seems to involve the compression of
> time by
>  >     >>> technology and by socioeconomic demands.
>  >     >>>
>  >     >>> The obvious critic of this kind of speed and acceleration, as
> Paul
>  >     >>> mentioned, is Virilio. Who I think relates speed to power in
> a way that
>  >     >>> makes sense of our experience of it as disenfranchising.
>  >     >>>
>  >     >>> Wanting to slow down from *this* kind of acceleration isn't a
> bad thing
>  >     >>> and is in fact the end point of MAP/Fixing The Future -style
>  >     >>> Accelerationism: let's get the machines to do the busy-work
> so we can do
>  >     >>> something actually useful with our time instead.
>  >     >>>
>  >     >>> The second is that Accelerationism isn't a historical epoch like
>  >     >>> postmodernism or globalisation. It's a *strategy*.
>  >     >>>
>  >     >>> If I was trolling I'd argue that if you're on the left you're
> either a
>  >     >>> conscious or an unconscious accelerationist. But it's
> possible to do
>  >     >>> things in an un-Accelerationist way - it's not an inescapable or
>  >     >>> inevitable cultural condition.
>  >     >>>
>  >     >>> What I think is worth reflecting on (even if only idly) in this
>  >     >>> discussion is whether there is anything in one's own life or
> work that
>  >     >>> this strategy would be productive for. What could each of us
> better
>  >     >>> understand and reason about (in some sense) so as to be able
> to better
>  >     >>> change it?
>  >     >>>
>  >     >>> Both these points indicate something that Left
> Accelerationism has been
>  >     >>> criticised for from various angles - it is a *selective*
> acceleration.
>  >     >>>
>  >     >>>> I am currently showing a live networked video piece, I
> created with
>  >     >>>> Gareth Foote, called /Time is Speeding Up/ at 20-21 Visual
> Arts Centre
>  >     >>>> up in Scunthorpe as part of the show We Are Not Alone. I
> have no idea
>  >     >>>> whether this is an Accelerationist artwork.
>  >     >>> It's increasing our ability to perceive and reason about our
> situation,
>  >     >>> so quite possibly.
>  >     >>>
>  >     >>>> I agonized about the aesthetics of the work- at first- so
> un-"cool", so
>  >     >>>> un-cyber - because the humans are so alive AND they make the
> work.
>  >     >>>> But now I'm really happy with it and would like to assert a
> place for
>  >     >>>> this almost folksy aesthetic (rather than a rush to slick,
> black
>  >     >>>> fluidity) in post-capitalist art.
>  >     >>> Bladerunner's lived-in street-culture future is
> paradigmatically cyber,
>  >     >>> but I do know what you mean. The work is qualitative (or has
> a strong
>  >     >>> qualitative element), and this is in contrast to the strong
> quantitative
>  >     >>> bias of shiny information graphics and *some* proposals for
>  >     >>> Accelerationist aesthetics.
>  >     >>>
>  >     >>> - Rob.
>  >     >>>
>  >
>  >
>  >
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-- 
P Thayer, Artist
http://pallthayer.dyndns.org
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