[NetBehaviour] #PostRefArt

marc garrett marc.garrett2 at gmail.com
Wed Jul 6 01:03:34 CEST 2016


Hi Edward,

Thanks for a very thoughtful post on the matter,

>I would rather that the referendum vote had gone in favour
>of staying in the EU, but I don't think the result was all that
>surprising and I don't think we should be too dismayed by it either.

The ‘official’ rules may change, but there is always another boss telling
us how to behave in accordance to their own opportunism, via other people’s
misfortune.

>I think it was a case of ordinary people voting against the establishment,
>because they feel that the establishment has betrayed them. Essentially it
>was the same kind of vote that brought Jeremy Corbyn to power. 'Anything's
>better than what we've got now.'

Yes, I agree. And this betrayal narrative seems to extend to what the
Global Research (http://bit.ly/29mqypY) website says, that about “half of
the voters, whether leave or remain, felt capitalism was a force for ill
rather than a force for good (51%:49%).” Also saying, this is one of
reasons why the Parliamentary Labour Party is so keen to get rid of Jeremy
Corbyn.

Of course, another reason which surely can’t be coincidental is that the
Chilcot Enquiry about the legality of the Iraq War, is released to the
public tomorrow, and I’m thinking they thought Corbyn would have been
ousted by then. And Corbyn sees Blair as a war criminal. So it’s going to
get pretty exciting in the next few days.

>They've just been through a recession which was caused by big business.
>Why should they vote the way big business wants them to vote in a
referendum?

One of the most disappointing things about Labour after the 2008 crash was
how in 2010, when the Liberals and Conservatives joined forces in
government; they allowed themselves to be blamed for the recession by the
Liberals and Conservatives, and by the media. This was a massive mistake,
because it frustrated many grass roots Labour voters as they watched their
party allow neo-liberal politics to reign free without any critique.

>I was in favour of staying in Europe because Europe has forced the
>British Government to accept certain environmental standards and
>workers' rights - and also because we need a Europe-wide solution
>to the refugee crisis. But to many people, the EU is virtually synonymous
>with things like the IMF and the G7. It's overwhelmingly monetarist in
>philosophy. It subscribes to the model of everlasting growth rather than
sustainability.

Same here…

I’ve been hearing some pro-remainers saying - well, at least we’ve got rid
of TTIP. However, it our relationship with the USA and NATO which seems
more threatening to me, “Brexit wouldn’t necessarily stop TTIP anyway –
that’s all down to the transition process. At the very least, Britain would
need to adopt many of TTIP’s provisions in order to remain in the single
market." (http://bit.ly/29gCXP9) And, for post-EU, the government is saying
it wishes to remain in the single market in order to maintain their version
of what they see as stability.

>We have to find more sustainable, environmentally-friendly, inclusive
>and humane ways of organising society. We have to find ways of generating
>wealth that also generate wellbeing.

Yep, this is where art orgs need to get their act together to make an
effort to build real things that create the conditions for social change,
where art is not only based on the markets. We need deeper levels or peer
engagement that allows artistic forms of emancipation to develop as
generational legacy, not whimsical trends.

Wishing you well.

marc

On 5 July 2016 at 20:01, Edward Picot <julian.lesaux at gmail.com> wrote:

> I would rather that the referendum vote had gone in favour of staying in
> the EU, but I don't think the result was all that surprising and I don't
> think we should be too dismayed by it either.
>
> Certainly there are people who will have voted out on the basis that they
> don't like immigrants and they don't like being told what to do by
> foreigners. Probably a lot of people. But beyond that, I think it was a
> case of ordinary people voting against the establishment, because they feel
> that the establishment has betrayed them. Essentially it was the same kind
> of vote that brought Jeremy Corbyn to power. 'Anything's better than what
> we've got now.'
>
> The Remain party made the mistake of basing their campaign on the line
> that the UK ought to stay in the EU because that was the best thing for big
> business. But ordinary people dislike and distrust big business as much as
> they do politicians. They've just been through a recession which was caused
> by big business. Why should they vote the way big business wants them to
> vote in a referendum?
>
> I was in favour of staying in Europe because Europe has forced the British
> Government to accept certain environmental standards and workers' rights -
> and also because we need a Europe-wide solution to the refugee crisis. But
> to many people, the EU is virtually synonymous with things like the IMF and
> the G7. It's overwhelmingly monetarist in philosophy. It subscribes to the
> model of everlasting growth rather than sustainability. Countries have to
> be profitable first: they can only afford a welfare system afterwards.
> Business is the most important layer of society, from which everything else
> flows. Governments are actually controlled by markets and banks, not vice
> versa. So when a crash comes, the markets and the banks don't have to pay
> for it, the poor people do. And countries like Greece have to be forced to
> pay debts they can't really afford, in case they set a bad example that
> leads to the collapse of the whole system.
>
> In or out of the EU, this is the status quo against which people are
> kicking. Immigration and sovereignty are really side-issues. We have to
> find more sustainable, environmentally-friendly, inclusive and humane ways
> of organising society. We have to find ways of generating wealth that also
> generate wellbeing.
>
> On the subject of artworks, it would be nice if we could launch an artwork
> that allowed people from the Calais refugee camp to enter the UK virtually,
> as they're prevented from entering it physically. It would be nice if they
> could scan themselves from head to foot, and life-size images of them could
> be printed off by 3D printers within the UK. Failing that, life-size
> pictures, complete with writeups of who they are, where they come from, how
> they have travelled to Calais and why they want to come to the UK, which
> could be guerilla-pasted onto the walls of UK towns and cities,
> Banksy-style, during the night. Or maybe even virtual 'empty shell'
> identities could be created here, complete with National Insurance and
> National Health numbers, ready for the refugees to step into if they ever
> manage to get this far.
>
> - Edward
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at netbehaviour.org
> http://www.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>



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Marc Garrett
Co-Founder, Co-Director and main editor of Furtherfield.

Furtherfield - A living, breathing, thriving network
http://www.furtherfield.org - for art, technology and social change since
1996

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