[NetBehaviour] Fwd: [CAS] NEW MEDIA ART XYZ - Where did new media art in the 1990s 'go'?

Michael Szpakowski m at michaelszpakowski.org
Mon Oct 8 11:16:17 CEST 2018


Hi Paul thanks for the generous and interesting response. For me the whole thing is very subjective. Net art and the community around it  at the turn of the century were crucial to me in that they enabled me to ‘become’ an artist - I can still summon the huge excitement of realising that I could make work that was kin to the ‘new media art’ I loved seeing in galleries ( and also that drew to some extent on the tradition of ,in particular US , avant garde film which I loved) but that I could do it at home as long as I was prepared to put some effort in and then I could also get people worldwide  to look at it and discuss it... So the taxonomic thing is more a continuum for me ( and I think you hint at this too). What seems to me utterly certain is that something has been lost ,as it always is ,when the logic of capital asserts itself. Finally Yes!  - definitely do a diagram:) ! Best wishes Michael 

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Sunday, October 7, 2018, 5:27 pm, Paul Hertz via NetBehaviour <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org> wrote:

Very funny, Michael. I have faved the sketch on Flickr.
OTOH, "new media art" for me doesn't bring to mind Internet '99 but rather the convergence of video art + interactive art in the mid 80s, called "New Media Art" starting more or less in the early 90s. 
As to where it went—I don't see so much a change in what people were doing, the kind of art they were making, as a change in nomenclature and context. Internet '99 is probably already called net.art, and its passage through the $MONEY function is notorious. Muntadas' File Room (1993) was staged as both a software-driven screen-based installation (the "classic" new media art form) and as an data-driven website. Arguably it marks a transition point from new media art to net.art; however, people have gone right on making the kind of interactive media installations that characterized much New Media Art—"interactive media installation" itself being one term frequently applied in the 90s. 
If the monetization of net.art marks its demise and the subsequent arrival of Internet Art, New Aesthetic, Glitch, Glitter, Twee, etc., there's also a change in how work gets selected for exhibition in the more visible institutions. Where you once had the sort of free-for-all juried shows where artists and non-artists showed together and the show was a a slice of the previous year's tech and aesthetic developments, now you see thematic and curated shows that have become a proving ground and career rung for ambitious (and mostly young) curators. The term "new media art" is regarded as impossibly broad, so more focused terms get used, to the point where the field fragments into the descriptive tropes used in various exhibitions and thematic shows, both in the "traditional" venues such as SIGGRAPH and ISEA and in the mainstream museums and galleries, where terminology is also a brand. 
But I go on. I should try to make a diagram. 
cheers, 
-- Paul





On Wed, Oct 3, 2018 at 5:04 PM Michael Szpakowski <m at michaelszpakowski.org> wrote:


Cheers Helen, Anne & Ruth delighted you like it - came from the heart :)                            from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


On Wednesday, October 3, 2018, 9:22 pm, Helen Varley Jamieson <helen at creative-catalyst.com> wrote:

 
yes, great michael! :D
 
 
 On 03.10.2018 19:09, Michael Szpakowski wrote:
  
 
 cheers Gretta! 
 
       From: Gretta Louw <gretta at grettalouw.com>
 To: Michael Szpakowski <m at michaelszpakowski.org>; NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org> 
 Sent: Wednesday, October 3, 2018 5:26 PM
 Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Fwd: [CAS] NEW MEDIA ART XYZ - Where did new media art in the 1990s 'go'?
  
  Spot on, Michael! 
 
 
  On 3 Oct 2018, at 5:15 pm, Michael Szpakowski <m at michaelszpakowski.org> wrote: 
   Here's my piece for this :) 
  https://www.flickr.com/photos/szpako/43264122610/
   anyone else? Garnet is cool with them being posted elsewhere as well as being submitted... 
  cheers m.
  
 
      From: Rob Myers <rob at robmyers.org>
 To: netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org 
 Sent: Wednesday, September 26, 2018 10:49 PM
 Subject: [NetBehaviour] Fwd: [CAS] NEW MEDIA ART XYZ - Where did new media art in the 1990s 'go'?
  
   ----- Original message -----
  From: Garnet Hertz <garnethertz at GMAIL.COM>
  To: CAS at JISCMAIL.AC.UK
  Subject: [CAS] NEW MEDIA ART XYZ - Where did new media art in the 1990s 'go'?
  Date: Wed, 26 Sep 2018 10:32:13 -0700
  
   NEW MEDIA ART XYZ
CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS (DEC 31 / 2018 DEADLINE)

What happened to new media art in the 1990s? At one point, it seemed to circulate in its own scene as a cohesive "thing" - but a few decades later, it's unclear where new media art went and how it evolved. Did it die, institutionalize into its own festivals or events, move into the larger art world, get swallowed up by social media platforms like YouTube or Instagram, or move into experimental HCI, the maker movement, critical design, or something else? What is the ‘XYZ’ shape or timeline of how new media art has evolved over the past 20 years?

"NEW MEDIA ART XYZ" is a collaborative publishing project that explores ideas about where new media art in the 1990s 'went'. The project seeks submissions from old and young new media artists, curators, festival organizers, writers, electronic artists, media theorists, hackers, haters or others interested in the topic of how new media has shifted, moved and evolved in the art community over the past two decades. In particular, the project is looking for submissions of single page A4 or 8.5" x 11" hand-drawn black-and-white diagrams that illustrate your concepts of what happened to new media art since the 1990s. The diagrams can be in portrait or landscape mode, can use any drawing medium - although pen or marker on white paper will likely reproduce best. Submissions must be hand-drawn (no computer aided design allowed), it must not be purely a text-based piece of writing (a diagram is required), and it must be received by December 31st 2018. Quick diagrams are welcomed: consider taking 5 minutes and drawing something on the nearest clean sheet of paper for your submission.

The drawings will be curated by Garnet Hertz, Canada Research Chair in Design & Media Arts. Hertz will select approximately 50 to 100 drawings, write an introduction, design the book, produce it as a physical publication, and release it online for free six months later. The hardcopy version of "NEW MEDIA ART XYZ" will be printed in a limited and numbered edition of 300 copies, all of which will be given away for free by Hertz. Free copies will be given to all accepted contributors, and after handmade copies and free online sources are released, it may be reformatted into a commercially available book.

Snail-mailed contributions can be sent to: Garnet Hertz, Emily Carr University of Art + Design, 520 East 1st Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5T 0H2, Canada. Scanned contributions should be at 300dpi or greater and emailed to garnethertz at gmail.com. Submissions can also be directly uploaded at http://newmediaart.xyz.

Hertz's past book projects have included 'Critical Making' (http://conceptlab.com/criticalmaking/) and 'Disobedient Electronics: Protest' (http://disobedientelectronics.com). As experimental publishing projects, these books explore alternate modes of disseminating knowledge. Approaches include making academic-oriented handmade bookworks, and giving artists more platforms to speak about theory related to their work. NEW MEDIA ART XYZ has a diagram-only policy for submissions in order to give more of a voice to artists that do not usually express their ideas in writing — and it encourages writers to draw. More information on Hertz can be found at http://conceptlab.com/ and more information on this project (and this call) can be found at http://newmediaart.xyz/.

Consider contributing something by December 31st 2018, and in exchange we will work hard to do something interesting with it. Contact Hertz directly if you have questions about this project, and please feel free to forward this call for submissions to people that have something interesting to contribute on the topic of new media art.

NEW MEDIA ART XYZ
c/o Garnet Hertz, Canada Research Chair in Design + Media Art
Emily Carr University of Art + Design
520 East 1st Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5T 0H2, Canada
garnethertz at gmail.com • http://newmediaart.xyz/
 
  
  -- 
      Dr. Garnet Hertz
  Canada Research Chair in Design and Media Arts
  Emily Carr University of Art and Design
  520 East 1st Avenue, Vancouver, BC, Canada  V5T 0H2
       
   
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 -- 
 
helen varley jamieson
 
 
 helen at creative-catalyst.com
 http://www.creative-catalyst.com
 http://www.upstage.org.nz
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