[NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost

Alan Sondheim sondheim at gmail.com
Mon Apr 6 02:02:57 CEST 2020


Hi Max - there's been confusion at my end etc.

Definitely my video isn't for phones; I can't control that of course, but
there are details (tiny writing, 'smudges,' etc.) that don't go through
really on a tiny screen. The same goes for the audio; I often emphasize the
bass and even sub-bass, which I hear well and have always preferred; these
don't come through small speakers or earbuds.

Two things - I do want to say how much I appreciate your replies and
careful thinking / bringing so many things to bear. (In my case "to bare"
and sorry for the pun!) And what are you doing musically? What are you
playing, etc.? I wonder if people on Netbehaviour might be interested in a
group improvisation sometime?

Best, Alan, thank you!

On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 7:56 PM Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com> wrote:

>
> Hi all,
>
> Reposting this, not sure if it went to the list?  Apologies for the
> redundancy.  🙂
>
> All best,
>
> Max
>
> +++++
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com>
> *Sent:* Sunday, April 5, 2020 4:40 PM
> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <
> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> *Cc:* Alan Sondheim <sondheim at gmail.com>
> *Subject:* Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
>
>
> Hi Alan,
>
> Your postings are often very evocative, so it's fun to reply but usually a
> fairly uncertain process.  🙂
>
> Some of the elements I missed (thank you for the descriptions) may have
> been caused by viewing the video on my phone.  I knew the image was
> filtered in some way, and there was some kind of shadow appearing then
> diffusing, but there was not too much in the way of clarity.  Viewed again
> now on my laptop I saw much more of what you described.
>
> Your texts and images include a lot of expertise, which is valuable and
> intriguing while also being sometimes complex or difficult.  I don't see
> this as a flaw at all, but on the contrary as a rich resource and impetus
> to greater understanding.  As a very rudimentary musician myself I miss a
> great deal in that sphere alone.  So, my own replies are perhaps doomed to
> be generic in a way that is important for me to remember, and which does
> give me pause.
>
> All very best and thanks again,
>
> Max
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on
> behalf of Alan Sondheim via NetBehaviour <
> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> *Sent:* Sunday, April 5, 2020 3:11 PM
> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <
> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> *Cc:* Alan Sondheim <sondheim at gmail.com>
> *Subject:* Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
>
> Hi, just a couple of points - first I appreciate your reply greatly.
> Re: Lurie - I'm not in any position to judge his work (which I've looked
> at); I'd like to read an account of how fundamental concepts are embodied
> and given priority in pure mathematics. Certainly his constructions come
> across as baroque; I'm not sure how they apply outside post-category theory
> (or even within category theory).
>
> The piece is about contagion, breathing, reversal. The image is a negative
> of course.
> The shakuhachi is played a couple of inches away from a cold window-pane
> with the sun in the background.
> Breath from the shakuhachi condenses, then disappears, from the
> window-pane.
> The breath appears 'like' a dark viral cloud, disappearing. The sound from
> the instrument produces the cloud which then evaporates. It's a cleansing
> and a conjuration.
> The shakuhachi is an instrument for meditation. There are only five
> finger-holes and it's end-blown. It's difficult. I had to hold it awkwardly
> in order to get the breath to condense in front of the camera, without the
> instrument appearing in the image.
> So the image seems ab nihilo except in relation to the sound. The sound
> might be a viral breath itself, a harbinger of death to come.
> Silence cleanses the image of course, evaporation.
> So it's bound to the phenomenology of sound and music, Kristeva's concept
> of the 'clean and proper body' and so forth.
> Jinashi shakuhachi are an older 'natural' style; mine is from around 1930.
> It's almost the sound of the bamboo itself. So it's the sound of a natural
> order in relation to another, the virus.
> The reference to ghost is to somatic ghosting, which I've written a great
> deal about, and talked about at London ICA etc.
> Panalal Ghosh is one of the most amazing and deep bansari players that
> ever lived.
>
> This was all thought out over a sleepless night. So I understand you
> running in a different direction with it of course; I do feel that the
> content, whichis/was already heavy, might have been missed, which is of
> course my own fault, for not spelling out the above?
>
> Best, Alan, and thank you
>
> On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 3:49 PM Max Herman via NetBehaviour <
> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org> wrote:
>
>
> Hi Alan,
>
> I like this video, jpg, and writing today.
>
> I have mild strabismus, and while watching the video on my phone I saw a
> single eye in the middle of the apartment building, sort of fleeting like
> that kind of image you have mentioned which is kind of like a morning
> hallucination.  I forget the term, apophatic?  No, that is something
> different maybe.  (Will check later; I prefer not to check missing word
> definitions right away these days.)  I read about the morning hallucination
> type in a book by Oliver Sacks called *Hallucinations*, I think.
>
> In any case, I saw a single eye in the middle of the screen due to
> strabismus, but it wasn't stable and morphed in and out of Visibility as
> the colors of the video changed.  As the video progressed, both eyes became
> visible in normal geometry, and of course normal in the black at the end of
> the video.  I like images (often like imaginary blueprints in my mind's
> eye, like bodies, or really, of the set of all bodies, which is to say the
> original pre-human primate matrix: the set of all bodies in the set of
> bodies in which my body lives, my group of 20 to 40 linked brains) of
> apartment buildings recently, in part due to starting reading Georges
> Perec's *Life, a User's Manual* as part of my study of Calvino's
> pre-emptively proposed syllabi *Six Memos* (*Sei Proposte per il Prossimo
> Millennio*).  I dream about apartment building plans sometimes.  They are
> kind of like grids, matrices, skeletons, or gardens, but with an organic
> and often organically pathogenic ingredient creeping in around the nooks
> and crannies perhaps because to be honest math is about equivalences not
> equality as identity, not about math at all, one might argue if Jacob Lurie
> is onto anything at Princeton with his new redefinition of all of
> mathematics based on his *Higer Topos Theory* of 2009.
>
> I also like that the bone marrow is part of the immune system, a truly
> marvelous part if I'm not mistaken, while also being the dietary discovery
> that the first pre-humans' tools made accessible thus immediately creating
> our human brains.
>
> There is also Kafka's story "The Knight of the Bucket," which I haven't
> read, but should look up and get, but is discussed by Calvino in his
> reminder or memorandum for our new third millennium "Lightness."  (It may
> be that in Calvino's composition, the first millennium was that of
> religion, the second that of the book, and the third, that of the
> network.)  In the Kafka story, the speaker goes looking for coal in his
> home city Vienna due to a bitter shortage of heat, out on the street
> freezing, then, amazingly, floating in the air.  He floats with his bucket
> above his landlord and landlady, asking them for coal, so that he won't
> freeze, but floats too high, eventually not being able to hear or speak to
> them.  The story ends with him floating across the landscape in search of.
>
> The word "basket" prompted me to think of the Kafka, I'm pretty sure.
>
> As to the corona, the crown, who is more monarchic, mono-archic, than
> death itself?  It is the principle of the emptiness of closedness, also
> symbolized in Calvino by a ring (which caused among other things
> Charlemagne's mythic necrophilia), its singleness and lack of Multiplicity
> (the which being Calvino's fifth and last memo because he died himself
> before writing the sixth, which I hypothesize was to have been about fear,
> the fear of death, petrifaction, and its corollary value, which I take to
> be delight, persistent observation and expression summed up by the word
> Consistency, in the sense of continuing on or not continuing on, which is
> also of course the comic corollary of the tragedy or tragos-ode, goat-song
> which arguably was the first practice of "Western Civilization" in
> pre-ancient Greece).
>
> Death is a mighty crown which we each get to wear in our own due time, but
> so is life.
>
> So, thanks for posting today, it is interesting to hear some Japanese
> words and concepts, if that is a correct interpretation, a good reminder to
> self to read up on those.  I know very few if any, the main ones if any
> being my own bastardized tragos-cycle of wabi-sabi-aware-yugen, taconite-
> and Teotihuacan-based, which I now have to also look up, but was able to
> find, link below.
>
> In any case, here is a marvelous poem from Basho, which today's
> reflections prompted me to find for the first time:
>
>
>           the beginning of furyu
>
>           this rice-planting
>
>           song of the north.
>
>
> All best,
>
> Max
>
> Notes and references:
>
> Wayback machine wabi-sabi project from 2004, titled "The Four Moods of
> Furyu"
>
> https://web.archive.org/web/20091028070421/http://www.geocities.com/genius-2000/furyu.html
>
> Perec at Wikipedia
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec
>
> Calvino's six Memos
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium
>
> Jacob Lurie:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie
>
> Bone marrow's lymphatic role:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role
>
> Kafka's Der Kubelreiter:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider
>
> Bartelby the Scrivener (only known topic of the unfinished Sixth Memo):
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales
>
> The history of furyu:
> https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/
>
> <https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
> JAPANESE AESTHETICS: FURYU | Shiseidodojo's Blog
> <https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
> Ukiyo-zōshi (浮世草子 ) or “books of the floating world” was the first major
> genus of popular Japanese fiction, by and large written between 1690 and
> 1770, primarily in Kyōto and Ōsaka. Ukiyo-zōshi style literature developed
> from kana-zōshi (仮名草子 ) [a type of printed Japanese book that was produced
> largely in Kyōto between 1600 and 1680, referring to books written in kana
> ...
> shiseidodojo.wordpress.com
>
> The Piazza Tales - Wikipedia
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales>
> The Piazza Tales is a collection of six short stories by American writer
> Herman Melville, published by Dix & Edwards in the United States in May
> 1856 and in Britain in June. Except for the newly written title story, "The
> Piazza," all of the stories had appeared in Putnam's Monthly in 1853-1855.
> en.wikipedia.org
>
> The Bucket Rider - Wikipedia
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider>
> "The Bucket Rider" (German: "Der Kübelreiter") is a short story by Franz
> Kafka, written in 1917. It first appeared in the Prager Presse in 1921 and
> was published posthumously in Beim Bau der Chinesischen Mauer (Berlin,
> 1931).The first English translation, by Willa and Edwin Muir, was published
> by Martin Secker in London in 1933. It also appeared in The Great Wall of
> China.
> en.wikipedia.org
>
> Bone marrow - Wikipedia
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role>
> Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which may be found within the spongy or
> cancellous portions of bones. In birds and mammals, bone marrow is the
> primary site of new blood cell production or hematopoiesis. It is composed
> of hematopoietic cells, marrow adipose tissue, and supportive stromal
> cells.In adult humans, bone marrow is primarily located in the ribs,
> vertebrae, sternum, and bones of the ...
> en.wikipedia.org
>
> Jacob Lurie - Wikipedia <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie>
> Jacob Lurie's results at International Mathematical Olympiad This article
> about an American mathematician is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by
> expanding it ...
> en.wikipedia.org
>
>
>
> Six Memos for the Next Millennium - Wikipedia
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium>
> Six Memos for the Next Millennium (Italian: Lezioni americane. Sei
> proposte per il prossimo millennio) is a book based on a series of lectures
> written by Italo Calvino for the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard,
> but never delivered as Calvino died before leaving Italy.The lectures were
> originally written in Italian and translated by Patrick Creagh.
> en.wikipedia.org
>
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
> Georges Perec - Wikipedia <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
> Georges Perec (born George Peretz) (French: [peʁɛk, pɛʁɛk]; 7 March 1936 –
> 3 March 1982) was a French novelist, filmmaker, documentalist, and
> essayist.He was a member of the Oulipo group. His father died as a soldier
> early in the Second World War and his mother was murdered in the Holocaust,
> and many of his works deal with absence, loss, and identity, often through
> word play.
> en.wikipedia.org
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on
> behalf of Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
> *Sent:* Sunday, April 5, 2020 11:25 AM
> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <
> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> *Subject:* [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
>
>
>
> shakuhachi ghost
>
> http://www.alansondheim.org/shakuhachighost.jpg
> https://youtu.be/FAAB7uAm7tg video
>
> somatic ghost extensions from within without the body playing
> on an off-tuned later afternoon evening sky hoping the virus
> is listening (no, not all they do is replicate or exist) (true
> they have no ears but then... pannalal ghosh perhaps... (true
> enough please note that they have no fundamental vibration)...
> shakuhachi ghost makes all visible, the fleeting moment of
> audible somnolence)...
>
> "he wants to practice shakuhachi"
> (holeless shakuhachi)
> (shakuhachi)
> (shakuhachi, 1930s jinashi, reverberation)
> * these pieces are no-string pieces for jiari shakuhachi
> - the shakuhachi has already split, but is still playable,
> ..it's after shakuhachi. song was beautiful. I used bone-body
> 1 = shakuhachi; 2 = corona-crown in suspension death
> Today I practice jinashi shakuhachi, and
> I begin focusing more on shakuhachi and will begin and lose
> = shakuhachi = shamisen = shard = sheffer = shimenawa = shinjuu
> A well-made shakuhachi is created from root bamboo, weeks worked
> She plays shakuhachi, whole worlds appear within the moist interior
> and while the shakuhachi is a body-bone, breathing the body, the
>
> colonies of protozoa in perfect suspension. after the shakuhachi
> is her basket, two robbers approached her. her shakuhachi was made
> from a body-bone, from a bone body, then
>
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>
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> 718-813-3285 **email sondheim ut panix.com <http://panix.com>, sondheim
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