[NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost

Roger Mills roger at eartrumpet.org
Mon Apr 6 13:57:16 CEST 2020


To go to Max’s point, Alan, I also experienced your inversion of image and sound as deeply evocative - the shakuhachi with its breathy timbre evokes the somnambulist's shallow breathing, walking into an uncontrolled waking dream-like state in which they think they are in control but in reality are not. As someone who has intermittently slept-walked through-out my life, this feeling can be at once, mysterious, unsettling, and life threatening, just as the virus is.

Roger

> On 6 Apr 2020, at 8:00 pm, netbehaviour-request at lists.netbehaviour.org wrote:
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> Today's Topics:
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>   1. shakuhachi ghost (Alan Sondheim)
>   2. Re: shakuhachi ghost (Max Herman)
>   3. Re: shakuhachi ghost (Alan Sondheim)
>   4. Re: shakuhachi ghost (Max Herman)
>   5. Re: shakuhachi ghost (Max Herman)
>   6. Re: shakuhachi ghost (Alan Sondheim)
>   7. Re: Invitation to join in dialogue, COVID Net Art discussion
>      (Graziano Milano)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2020 12:25:11 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> Message-ID: <alpine.NEB.2.21.2004051225020.13328 at panix3.panix.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed
> 
> 
> 
> shakuhachi ghost
> 
> http://www.alansondheim.org/shakuhachighost.jpg
> https://youtu.be/FAAB7uAm7tg video
> 
> somatic ghost extensions from within without the body playing
> on an off-tuned later afternoon evening sky hoping the virus
> is listening (no, not all they do is replicate or exist) (true
> they have no ears but then... pannalal ghosh perhaps... (true
> enough please note that they have no fundamental vibration)...
> shakuhachi ghost makes all visible, the fleeting moment of
> audible somnolence)...
> 
> "he wants to practice shakuhachi"
> (holeless shakuhachi)
> (shakuhachi)
> (shakuhachi, 1930s jinashi, reverberation)
> * these pieces are no-string pieces for jiari shakuhachi
> - the shakuhachi has already split, but is still playable,
> ..it's after shakuhachi. song was beautiful. I used bone-body
> 1 = shakuhachi; 2 = corona-crown in suspension death
> Today I practice jinashi shakuhachi, and
> I begin focusing more on shakuhachi and will begin and lose
> = shakuhachi = shamisen = shard = sheffer = shimenawa = shinjuu
> A well-made shakuhachi is created from root bamboo, weeks worked
> She plays shakuhachi, whole worlds appear within the moist interior
> and while the shakuhachi is a body-bone, breathing the body, the
> 
> colonies of protozoa in perfect suspension. after the shakuhachi
> is her basket, two robbers approached her. her shakuhachi was made
> from a body-bone, from a bone body, then
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2020 19:48:00 +0000
> From: Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> Message-ID:
> 	<DM5PR0102MB349586F7549271EF9F037A1AA5C50 at DM5PR0102MB3495.prod.exchangelabs.com>
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> 
> Hi Alan,
> 
> I like this video, jpg, and writing today.
> 
> I have mild strabismus, and while watching the video on my phone I saw a single eye in the middle of the apartment building, sort of fleeting like that kind of image you have mentioned which is kind of like a morning hallucination.  I forget the term, apophatic?  No, that is something different maybe.  (Will check later; I prefer not to check missing word definitions right away these days.)  I read about the morning hallucination type in a book by Oliver Sacks called Hallucinations, I think.
> 
> In any case, I saw a single eye in the middle of the screen due to strabismus, but it wasn't stable and morphed in and out of Visibility as the colors of the video changed.  As the video progressed, both eyes became visible in normal geometry, and of course normal in the black at the end of the video.  I like images (often like imaginary blueprints in my mind's eye, like bodies, or really, of the set of all bodies, which is to say the original pre-human primate matrix: the set of all bodies in the set of bodies in which my body lives, my group of 20 to 40 linked brains) of apartment buildings recently, in part due to starting reading Georges Perec's Life, a User's Manual as part of my study of Calvino's pre-emptively proposed syllabi Six Memos (Sei Proposte per il Prossimo Millennio).  I dream about apartment building plans sometimes.  They are kind of like grids, matrices, skeletons, or gardens, but with an organic and often organically pathogenic ingredient creeping in around the n
> ooks and crannies perhaps because to be honest math is about equivalences not equality as identity, not about math at all, one might argue if Jacob Lurie is onto anything at Princeton with his new redefinition of all of mathematics based on his Higer Topos Theory of 2009.
> 
> I also like that the bone marrow is part of the immune system, a truly marvelous part if I'm not mistaken, while also being the dietary discovery that the first pre-humans' tools made accessible thus immediately creating our human brains.
> 
> There is also Kafka's story "The Knight of the Bucket," which I haven't read, but should look up and get, but is discussed by Calvino in his reminder or memorandum for our new third millennium "Lightness."  (It may be that in Calvino's composition, the first millennium was that of religion, the second that of the book, and the third, that of the network.)  In the Kafka story, the speaker goes looking for coal in his home city Vienna due to a bitter shortage of heat, out on the street freezing, then, amazingly, floating in the air.  He floats with his bucket above his landlord and landlady, asking them for coal, so that he won't freeze, but floats too high, eventually not being able to hear or speak to them.  The story ends with him floating across the landscape in search of.
> 
> The word "basket" prompted me to think of the Kafka, I'm pretty sure.
> 
> As to the corona, the crown, who is more monarchic, mono-archic, than death itself?  It is the principle of the emptiness of closedness, also symbolized in Calvino by a ring (which caused among other things Charlemagne's mythic necrophilia), its singleness and lack of Multiplicity (the which being Calvino's fifth and last memo because he died himself before writing the sixth, which I hypothesize was to have been about fear, the fear of death, petrifaction, and its corollary value, which I take to be delight, persistent observation and expression summed up by the word Consistency, in the sense of continuing on or not continuing on, which is also of course the comic corollary of the tragedy or tragos-ode, goat-song which arguably was the first practice of "Western Civilization" in pre-ancient Greece).
> 
> Death is a mighty crown which we each get to wear in our own due time, but so is life.
> 
> So, thanks for posting today, it is interesting to hear some Japanese words and concepts, if that is a correct interpretation, a good reminder to self to read up on those.  I know very few if any, the main ones if any being my own bastardized tragos-cycle of wabi-sabi-aware-yugen, taconite- and Teotihuacan-based, which I now have to also look up, but was able to find, link below.
> 
> In any case, here is a marvelous poem from Basho, which today's reflections prompted me to find for the first time:
> 
> 
>          the beginning of furyu
> 
>          this rice-planting
> 
>          song of the north.
> 
> 
> All best,
> 
> Max
> 
> Notes and references:
> 
> Wayback machine wabi-sabi project from 2004, titled "The Four Moods of Furyu"
> https://web.archive.org/web/20091028070421/http://www.geocities.com/genius-2000/furyu.html
> 
> Perec at Wikipedia
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec
> 
> Calvino's six Memos
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium
> 
> Jacob Lurie:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie
> 
> Bone marrow's lymphatic role:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role
> 
> Kafka's Der Kubelreiter:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider
> 
> Bartelby the Scrivener (only known topic of the unfinished Sixth Memo):
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales
> 
> The history of furyu:
> https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/
> 
> [https://shiseidodojo.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/ikeno_taiga_001-mod-1.jpg]<https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
> JAPANESE AESTHETICS: FURYU | Shiseidodojo's Blog<https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
> Ukiyo-z?shi (???? ) or ?books of the floating world? was the first major genus of popular Japanese fiction, by and large written between 1690 and 1770, primarily in Ky?to and ?saka. Ukiyo-z?shi style literature developed from kana-z?shi (???? ) [a type of printed Japanese book that was produced largely in Ky?to between 1600 and 1680, referring to books written in kana ...
> shiseidodojo.wordpress.com
> 
> The Piazza Tales - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales>
> The Piazza Tales is a collection of six short stories by American writer Herman Melville, published by Dix & Edwards in the United States in May 1856 and in Britain in June. Except for the newly written title story, "The Piazza," all of the stories had appeared in Putnam's Monthly in 1853-1855.
> en.wikipedia.org
> 
> The Bucket Rider - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider>
> "The Bucket Rider" (German: "Der K?belreiter") is a short story by Franz Kafka, written in 1917. It first appeared in the Prager Presse in 1921 and was published posthumously in Beim Bau der Chinesischen Mauer (Berlin, 1931).The first English translation, by Willa and Edwin Muir, was published by Martin Secker in London in 1933. It also appeared in The Great Wall of China.
> en.wikipedia.org
> 
> Bone marrow - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role>
> Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which may be found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bones. In birds and mammals, bone marrow is the primary site of new blood cell production or hematopoiesis. It is composed of hematopoietic cells, marrow adipose tissue, and supportive stromal cells.In adult humans, bone marrow is primarily located in the ribs, vertebrae, sternum, and bones of the ...
> en.wikipedia.org
> 
> Jacob Lurie - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie>
> Jacob Lurie's results at International Mathematical Olympiad This article about an American mathematician is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it ...
> en.wikipedia.org
> 
> 
> 
> Six Memos for the Next Millennium - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium>
> Six Memos for the Next Millennium (Italian: Lezioni americane. Sei proposte per il prossimo millennio) is a book based on a series of lectures written by Italo Calvino for the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard, but never delivered as Calvino died before leaving Italy.The lectures were originally written in Italian and translated by Patrick Creagh.
> en.wikipedia.org
> 
> [https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/78/Georges_Perec.jpg]<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
> Georges Perec - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
> Georges Perec (born George Peretz) (French: [pe??k, p???k]; 7 March 1936 ? 3 March 1982) was a French novelist, filmmaker, documentalist, and essayist.He was a member of the Oulipo group. His father died as a soldier early in the Second World War and his mother was murdered in the Holocaust, and many of his works deal with absence, loss, and identity, often through word play.
> en.wikipedia.org
> 
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on behalf of Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
> Sent: Sunday, April 5, 2020 11:25 AM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> 
> 
> 
> shakuhachi ghost
> 
> http://www.alansondheim.org/shakuhachighost.jpg
> https://youtu.be/FAAB7uAm7tg video
> 
> somatic ghost extensions from within without the body playing
> on an off-tuned later afternoon evening sky hoping the virus
> is listening (no, not all they do is replicate or exist) (true
> they have no ears but then... pannalal ghosh perhaps... (true
> enough please note that they have no fundamental vibration)...
> shakuhachi ghost makes all visible, the fleeting moment of
> audible somnolence)...
> 
> "he wants to practice shakuhachi"
> (holeless shakuhachi)
> (shakuhachi)
> (shakuhachi, 1930s jinashi, reverberation)
> * these pieces are no-string pieces for jiari shakuhachi
> - the shakuhachi has already split, but is still playable,
> ..it's after shakuhachi. song was beautiful. I used bone-body
> 1 = shakuhachi; 2 = corona-crown in suspension death
> Today I practice jinashi shakuhachi, and
> I begin focusing more on shakuhachi and will begin and lose
> = shakuhachi = shamisen = shard = sheffer = shimenawa = shinjuu
> A well-made shakuhachi is created from root bamboo, weeks worked
> She plays shakuhachi, whole worlds appear within the moist interior
> and while the shakuhachi is a body-bone, breathing the body, the
> 
> colonies of protozoa in perfect suspension. after the shakuhachi
> is her basket, two robbers approached her. her shakuhachi was made
> from a body-bone, from a bone body, then
> 
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2020 16:11:35 -0400
> From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at gmail.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> Message-ID:
> 	<CAO=pi2BPhrSWs6Y83=24ZneLrphPnu+PcYpn928z9SPWmYwyvA at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Hi, just a couple of points - first I appreciate your reply greatly.
> Re: Lurie - I'm not in any position to judge his work (which I've looked
> at); I'd like to read an account of how fundamental concepts are embodied
> and given priority in pure mathematics. Certainly his constructions come
> across as baroque; I'm not sure how they apply outside post-category theory
> (or even within category theory).
> 
> The piece is about contagion, breathing, reversal. The image is a negative
> of course.
> The shakuhachi is played a couple of inches away from a cold window-pane
> with the sun in the background.
> Breath from the shakuhachi condenses, then disappears, from the
> window-pane.
> The breath appears 'like' a dark viral cloud, disappearing. The sound from
> the instrument produces the cloud which then evaporates. It's a cleansing
> and a conjuration.
> The shakuhachi is an instrument for meditation. There are only five
> finger-holes and it's end-blown. It's difficult. I had to hold it awkwardly
> in order to get the breath to condense in front of the camera, without the
> instrument appearing in the image.
> So the image seems ab nihilo except in relation to the sound. The sound
> might be a viral breath itself, a harbinger of death to come.
> Silence cleanses the image of course, evaporation.
> So it's bound to the phenomenology of sound and music, Kristeva's concept
> of the 'clean and proper body' and so forth.
> Jinashi shakuhachi are an older 'natural' style; mine is from around 1930.
> It's almost the sound of the bamboo itself. So it's the sound of a natural
> order in relation to another, the virus.
> The reference to ghost is to somatic ghosting, which I've written a great
> deal about, and talked about at London ICA etc.
> Panalal Ghosh is one of the most amazing and deep bansari players that ever
> lived.
> 
> This was all thought out over a sleepless night. So I understand you
> running in a different direction with it of course; I do feel that the
> content, whichis/was already heavy, might have been missed, which is of
> course my own fault, for not spelling out the above?
> 
> Best, Alan, and thank you
> 
> On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 3:49 PM Max Herman via NetBehaviour <
> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org> wrote:
> 
>> 
>> Hi Alan,
>> 
>> I like this video, jpg, and writing today.
>> 
>> I have mild strabismus, and while watching the video on my phone I saw a
>> single eye in the middle of the apartment building, sort of fleeting like
>> that kind of image you have mentioned which is kind of like a morning
>> hallucination.  I forget the term, apophatic?  No, that is something
>> different maybe.  (Will check later; I prefer not to check missing word
>> definitions right away these days.)  I read about the morning hallucination
>> type in a book by Oliver Sacks called *Hallucinations*, I think.
>> 
>> In any case, I saw a single eye in the middle of the screen due to
>> strabismus, but it wasn't stable and morphed in and out of Visibility as
>> the colors of the video changed.  As the video progressed, both eyes became
>> visible in normal geometry, and of course normal in the black at the end of
>> the video.  I like images (often like imaginary blueprints in my mind's
>> eye, like bodies, or really, of the set of all bodies, which is to say the
>> original pre-human primate matrix: the set of all bodies in the set of
>> bodies in which my body lives, my group of 20 to 40 linked brains) of
>> apartment buildings recently, in part due to starting reading Georges
>> Perec's *Life, a User's Manual* as part of my study of Calvino's
>> pre-emptively proposed syllabi *Six Memos* (*Sei Proposte per il Prossimo
>> Millennio*).  I dream about apartment building plans sometimes.  They are
>> kind of like grids, matrices, skeletons, or gardens, but with an organic
>> and often organically pathogenic ingredient creeping in around the nooks
>> and crannies perhaps because to be honest math is about equivalences not
>> equality as identity, not about math at all, one might argue if Jacob Lurie
>> is onto anything at Princeton with his new redefinition of all of
>> mathematics based on his *Higer Topos Theory* of 2009.
>> 
>> I also like that the bone marrow is part of the immune system, a truly
>> marvelous part if I'm not mistaken, while also being the dietary discovery
>> that the first pre-humans' tools made accessible thus immediately creating
>> our human brains.
>> 
>> There is also Kafka's story "The Knight of the Bucket," which I haven't
>> read, but should look up and get, but is discussed by Calvino in his
>> reminder or memorandum for our new third millennium "Lightness."  (It may
>> be that in Calvino's composition, the first millennium was that of
>> religion, the second that of the book, and the third, that of the
>> network.)  In the Kafka story, the speaker goes looking for coal in his
>> home city Vienna due to a bitter shortage of heat, out on the street
>> freezing, then, amazingly, floating in the air.  He floats with his bucket
>> above his landlord and landlady, asking them for coal, so that he won't
>> freeze, but floats too high, eventually not being able to hear or speak to
>> them.  The story ends with him floating across the landscape in search of.
>> 
>> The word "basket" prompted me to think of the Kafka, I'm pretty sure.
>> 
>> As to the corona, the crown, who is more monarchic, mono-archic, than
>> death itself?  It is the principle of the emptiness of closedness, also
>> symbolized in Calvino by a ring (which caused among other things
>> Charlemagne's mythic necrophilia), its singleness and lack of Multiplicity
>> (the which being Calvino's fifth and last memo because he died himself
>> before writing the sixth, which I hypothesize was to have been about fear,
>> the fear of death, petrifaction, and its corollary value, which I take to
>> be delight, persistent observation and expression summed up by the word
>> Consistency, in the sense of continuing on or not continuing on, which is
>> also of course the comic corollary of the tragedy or tragos-ode, goat-song
>> which arguably was the first practice of "Western Civilization" in
>> pre-ancient Greece).
>> 
>> Death is a mighty crown which we each get to wear in our own due time, but
>> so is life.
>> 
>> So, thanks for posting today, it is interesting to hear some Japanese
>> words and concepts, if that is a correct interpretation, a good reminder to
>> self to read up on those.  I know very few if any, the main ones if any
>> being my own bastardized tragos-cycle of wabi-sabi-aware-yugen, taconite-
>> and Teotihuacan-based, which I now have to also look up, but was able to
>> find, link below.
>> 
>> In any case, here is a marvelous poem from Basho, which today's
>> reflections prompted me to find for the first time:
>> 
>> 
>>          the beginning of furyu
>> 
>>          this rice-planting
>> 
>>          song of the north.
>> 
>> 
>> All best,
>> 
>> Max
>> 
>> Notes and references:
>> 
>> Wayback machine wabi-sabi project from 2004, titled "The Four Moods of
>> Furyu"
>> 
>> https://web.archive.org/web/20091028070421/http://www.geocities.com/genius-2000/furyu.html
>> 
>> Perec at Wikipedia
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec
>> 
>> Calvino's six Memos
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium
>> 
>> Jacob Lurie:
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie
>> 
>> Bone marrow's lymphatic role:
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role
>> 
>> Kafka's Der Kubelreiter:
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider
>> 
>> Bartelby the Scrivener (only known topic of the unfinished Sixth Memo):
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales
>> 
>> The history of furyu:
>> https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/
>> 
>> <https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
>> JAPANESE AESTHETICS: FURYU | Shiseidodojo's Blog
>> <https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
>> Ukiyo-z?shi (???? ) or ?books of the floating world? was the first major
>> genus of popular Japanese fiction, by and large written between 1690 and
>> 1770, primarily in Ky?to and ?saka. Ukiyo-z?shi style literature developed
>> from kana-z?shi (???? ) [a type of printed Japanese book that was produced
>> largely in Ky?to between 1600 and 1680, referring to books written in kana
>> ...
>> shiseidodojo.wordpress.com
>> 
>> The Piazza Tales - Wikipedia
>> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales>
>> The Piazza Tales is a collection of six short stories by American writer
>> Herman Melville, published by Dix & Edwards in the United States in May
>> 1856 and in Britain in June. Except for the newly written title story, "The
>> Piazza," all of the stories had appeared in Putnam's Monthly in 1853-1855.
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> The Bucket Rider - Wikipedia
>> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider>
>> "The Bucket Rider" (German: "Der K?belreiter") is a short story by Franz
>> Kafka, written in 1917. It first appeared in the Prager Presse in 1921 and
>> was published posthumously in Beim Bau der Chinesischen Mauer (Berlin,
>> 1931).The first English translation, by Willa and Edwin Muir, was published
>> by Martin Secker in London in 1933. It also appeared in The Great Wall of
>> China.
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> Bone marrow - Wikipedia
>> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role>
>> Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which may be found within the spongy or
>> cancellous portions of bones. In birds and mammals, bone marrow is the
>> primary site of new blood cell production or hematopoiesis. It is composed
>> of hematopoietic cells, marrow adipose tissue, and supportive stromal
>> cells.In adult humans, bone marrow is primarily located in the ribs,
>> vertebrae, sternum, and bones of the ...
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> Jacob Lurie - Wikipedia <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie>
>> Jacob Lurie's results at International Mathematical Olympiad This article
>> about an American mathematician is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by
>> expanding it ...
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Six Memos for the Next Millennium - Wikipedia
>> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium>
>> Six Memos for the Next Millennium (Italian: Lezioni americane. Sei
>> proposte per il prossimo millennio) is a book based on a series of lectures
>> written by Italo Calvino for the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard,
>> but never delivered as Calvino died before leaving Italy.The lectures were
>> originally written in Italian and translated by Patrick Creagh.
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
>> Georges Perec - Wikipedia <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
>> Georges Perec (born George Peretz) (French: [pe??k, p???k]; 7 March 1936 ?
>> 3 March 1982) was a French novelist, filmmaker, documentalist, and
>> essayist.He was a member of the Oulipo group. His father died as a soldier
>> early in the Second World War and his mother was murdered in the Holocaust,
>> and many of his works deal with absence, loss, and identity, often through
>> word play.
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on
>> behalf of Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
>> *Sent:* Sunday, April 5, 2020 11:25 AM
>> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <
>> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
>> *Subject:* [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> shakuhachi ghost
>> 
>> http://www.alansondheim.org/shakuhachighost.jpg
>> https://youtu.be/FAAB7uAm7tg video
>> 
>> somatic ghost extensions from within without the body playing
>> on an off-tuned later afternoon evening sky hoping the virus
>> is listening (no, not all they do is replicate or exist) (true
>> they have no ears but then... pannalal ghosh perhaps... (true
>> enough please note that they have no fundamental vibration)...
>> shakuhachi ghost makes all visible, the fleeting moment of
>> audible somnolence)...
>> 
>> "he wants to practice shakuhachi"
>> (holeless shakuhachi)
>> (shakuhachi)
>> (shakuhachi, 1930s jinashi, reverberation)
>> * these pieces are no-string pieces for jiari shakuhachi
>> - the shakuhachi has already split, but is still playable,
>> ..it's after shakuhachi. song was beautiful. I used bone-body
>> 1 = shakuhachi; 2 = corona-crown in suspension death
>> Today I practice jinashi shakuhachi, and
>> I begin focusing more on shakuhachi and will begin and lose
>> = shakuhachi = shamisen = shard = sheffer = shimenawa = shinjuu
>> A well-made shakuhachi is created from root bamboo, weeks worked
>> She plays shakuhachi, whole worlds appear within the moist interior
>> and while the shakuhachi is a body-bone, breathing the body, the
>> 
>> colonies of protozoa in perfect suspension. after the shakuhachi
>> is her basket, two robbers approached her. her shakuhachi was made
>> from a body-bone, from a bone body, then
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> NetBehaviour mailing list
>> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
>> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>> _______________________________________________
>> NetBehaviour mailing list
>> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
>> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> *=====================================================*
> 
> *directory http://www.alansondheim.org <http://www.alansondheim.org> tel
> 718-813-3285**email sondheim ut panix.com <http://panix.com>, sondheim ut
> gmail.com <http://gmail.com>*
> *=====================================================*
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2020 21:40:12 +0000
> From: Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> Message-ID:
> 	<DM5PR0102MB34957CED63A09FDB1301263CA5C50 at DM5PR0102MB3495.prod.exchangelabs.com>
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> 
> Hi Alan,
> 
> Your postings are often very evocative, so it's fun to reply but usually a fairly uncertain process.  ?
> 
> Some of the elements I missed (thank you for the descriptions) may have been caused by viewing the video on my phone.  I knew the image was filtered in some way, and there was some kind of shadow appearing then diffusing, but there was not too much in the way of clarity.  Viewed again now on my laptop I saw much more of what you described.
> 
> Your texts and images include a lot of expertise, which is valuable and intriguing while also being sometimes complex or difficult.  I don't see this as a flaw at all, but on the contrary as a rich resource and impetus to greater understanding.  As a very rudimentary musician myself I miss a great deal in that sphere alone.  So, my own replies are perhaps doomed to be generic in a way that is important for me to remember, and which does give me pause.
> 
> All very best and thanks again,
> 
> Max
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on behalf of Alan Sondheim via NetBehaviour <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Sent: Sunday, April 5, 2020 3:11 PM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Cc: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> 
> Hi, just a couple of points - first I appreciate your reply greatly.
> Re: Lurie - I'm not in any position to judge his work (which I've looked at); I'd like to read an account of how fundamental concepts are embodied and given priority in pure mathematics. Certainly his constructions come across as baroque; I'm not sure how they apply outside post-category theory (or even within category theory).
> 
> The piece is about contagion, breathing, reversal. The image is a negative of course.
> The shakuhachi is played a couple of inches away from a cold window-pane with the sun in the background.
> Breath from the shakuhachi condenses, then disappears, from the window-pane.
> The breath appears 'like' a dark viral cloud, disappearing. The sound from the instrument produces the cloud which then evaporates. It's a cleansing and a conjuration.
> The shakuhachi is an instrument for meditation. There are only five finger-holes and it's end-blown. It's difficult. I had to hold it awkwardly in order to get the breath to condense in front of the camera, without the instrument appearing in the image.
> So the image seems ab nihilo except in relation to the sound. The sound might be a viral breath itself, a harbinger of death to come.
> Silence cleanses the image of course, evaporation.
> So it's bound to the phenomenology of sound and music, Kristeva's concept of the 'clean and proper body' and so forth.
> Jinashi shakuhachi are an older 'natural' style; mine is from around 1930. It's almost the sound of the bamboo itself. So it's the sound of a natural order in relation to another, the virus.
> The reference to ghost is to somatic ghosting, which I've written a great deal about, and talked about at London ICA etc.
> Panalal Ghosh is one of the most amazing and deep bansari players that ever lived.
> 
> This was all thought out over a sleepless night. So I understand you running in a different direction with it of course; I do feel that the content, whichis/was already heavy, might have been missed, which is of course my own fault, for not spelling out the above?
> 
> Best, Alan, and thank you
> 
> On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 3:49 PM Max Herman via NetBehaviour <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org<mailto:netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>> wrote:
> 
> Hi Alan,
> 
> I like this video, jpg, and writing today.
> 
> I have mild strabismus, and while watching the video on my phone I saw a single eye in the middle of the apartment building, sort of fleeting like that kind of image you have mentioned which is kind of like a morning hallucination.  I forget the term, apophatic?  No, that is something different maybe.  (Will check later; I prefer not to check missing word definitions right away these days.)  I read about the morning hallucination type in a book by Oliver Sacks called Hallucinations, I think.
> 
> In any case, I saw a single eye in the middle of the screen due to strabismus, but it wasn't stable and morphed in and out of Visibility as the colors of the video changed.  As the video progressed, both eyes became visible in normal geometry, and of course normal in the black at the end of the video.  I like images (often like imaginary blueprints in my mind's eye, like bodies, or really, of the set of all bodies, which is to say the original pre-human primate matrix: the set of all bodies in the set of bodies in which my body lives, my group of 20 to 40 linked brains) of apartment buildings recently, in part due to starting reading Georges Perec's Life, a User's Manual as part of my study of Calvino's pre-emptively proposed syllabi Six Memos (Sei Proposte per il Prossimo Millennio).  I dream about apartment building plans sometimes.  They are kind of like grids, matrices, skeletons, or gardens, but with an organic and often organically pathogenic ingredient creeping in around the n
> ooks and crannies perhaps because to be honest math is about equivalences not equality as identity, not about math at all, one might argue if Jacob Lurie is onto anything at Princeton with his new redefinition of all of mathematics based on his Higer Topos Theory of 2009.
> 
> I also like that the bone marrow is part of the immune system, a truly marvelous part if I'm not mistaken, while also being the dietary discovery that the first pre-humans' tools made accessible thus immediately creating our human brains.
> 
> There is also Kafka's story "The Knight of the Bucket," which I haven't read, but should look up and get, but is discussed by Calvino in his reminder or memorandum for our new third millennium "Lightness."  (It may be that in Calvino's composition, the first millennium was that of religion, the second that of the book, and the third, that of the network.)  In the Kafka story, the speaker goes looking for coal in his home city Vienna due to a bitter shortage of heat, out on the street freezing, then, amazingly, floating in the air.  He floats with his bucket above his landlord and landlady, asking them for coal, so that he won't freeze, but floats too high, eventually not being able to hear or speak to them.  The story ends with him floating across the landscape in search of.
> 
> The word "basket" prompted me to think of the Kafka, I'm pretty sure.
> 
> As to the corona, the crown, who is more monarchic, mono-archic, than death itself?  It is the principle of the emptiness of closedness, also symbolized in Calvino by a ring (which caused among other things Charlemagne's mythic necrophilia), its singleness and lack of Multiplicity (the which being Calvino's fifth and last memo because he died himself before writing the sixth, which I hypothesize was to have been about fear, the fear of death, petrifaction, and its corollary value, which I take to be delight, persistent observation and expression summed up by the word Consistency, in the sense of continuing on or not continuing on, which is also of course the comic corollary of the tragedy or tragos-ode, goat-song which arguably was the first practice of "Western Civilization" in pre-ancient Greece).
> 
> Death is a mighty crown which we each get to wear in our own due time, but so is life.
> 
> So, thanks for posting today, it is interesting to hear some Japanese words and concepts, if that is a correct interpretation, a good reminder to self to read up on those.  I know very few if any, the main ones if any being my own bastardized tragos-cycle of wabi-sabi-aware-yugen, taconite- and Teotihuacan-based, which I now have to also look up, but was able to find, link below.
> 
> In any case, here is a marvelous poem from Basho, which today's reflections prompted me to find for the first time:
> 
> 
>          the beginning of furyu
> 
>          this rice-planting
> 
>          song of the north.
> 
> 
> All best,
> 
> Max
> 
> Notes and references:
> 
> Wayback machine wabi-sabi project from 2004, titled "The Four Moods of Furyu"
> https://web.archive.org/web/20091028070421/http://www.geocities.com/genius-2000/furyu.html
> 
> Perec at Wikipedia
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec
> 
> Calvino's six Memos
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium
> 
> Jacob Lurie:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie
> 
> Bone marrow's lymphatic role:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role
> 
> Kafka's Der Kubelreiter:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider
> 
> Bartelby the Scrivener (only known topic of the unfinished Sixth Memo):
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales
> 
> The history of furyu:
> https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/
> 
> [https://shiseidodojo.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/ikeno_taiga_001-mod-1.jpg]<https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
> JAPANESE AESTHETICS: FURYU | Shiseidodojo's Blog<https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
> Ukiyo-z?shi (???? ) or ?books of the floating world? was the first major genus of popular Japanese fiction, by and large written between 1690 and 1770, primarily in Ky?to and ?saka. Ukiyo-z?shi style literature developed from kana-z?shi (???? ) [a type of printed Japanese book that was produced largely in Ky?to between 1600 and 1680, referring to books written in kana ...
> shiseidodojo.wordpress.com<http://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com>
> 
> The Piazza Tales - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales>
> The Piazza Tales is a collection of six short stories by American writer Herman Melville, published by Dix & Edwards in the United States in May 1856 and in Britain in June. Except for the newly written title story, "The Piazza," all of the stories had appeared in Putnam's Monthly in 1853-1855.
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> The Bucket Rider - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider>
> "The Bucket Rider" (German: "Der K?belreiter") is a short story by Franz Kafka, written in 1917. It first appeared in the Prager Presse in 1921 and was published posthumously in Beim Bau der Chinesischen Mauer (Berlin, 1931).The first English translation, by Willa and Edwin Muir, was published by Martin Secker in London in 1933. It also appeared in The Great Wall of China.
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> Bone marrow - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role>
> Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which may be found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bones. In birds and mammals, bone marrow is the primary site of new blood cell production or hematopoiesis. It is composed of hematopoietic cells, marrow adipose tissue, and supportive stromal cells.In adult humans, bone marrow is primarily located in the ribs, vertebrae, sternum, and bones of the ...
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> Jacob Lurie - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie>
> Jacob Lurie's results at International Mathematical Olympiad This article about an American mathematician is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it ...
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> 
> 
> Six Memos for the Next Millennium - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium>
> Six Memos for the Next Millennium (Italian: Lezioni americane. Sei proposte per il prossimo millennio) is a book based on a series of lectures written by Italo Calvino for the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard, but never delivered as Calvino died before leaving Italy.The lectures were originally written in Italian and translated by Patrick Creagh.
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> [https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/78/Georges_Perec.jpg]<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
> Georges Perec - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
> Georges Perec (born George Peretz) (French: [pe??k, p???k]; 7 March 1936 ? 3 March 1982) was a French novelist, filmmaker, documentalist, and essayist.He was a member of the Oulipo group. His father died as a soldier early in the Second World War and his mother was murdered in the Holocaust, and many of his works deal with absence, loss, and identity, often through word play.
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org<mailto:netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org>> on behalf of Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com<mailto:sondheim at panix.com>>
> Sent: Sunday, April 5, 2020 11:25 AM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org<mailto:netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>>
> Subject: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> 
> 
> 
> shakuhachi ghost
> 
> http://www.alansondheim.org/shakuhachighost.jpg
> https://youtu.be/FAAB7uAm7tg video
> 
> somatic ghost extensions from within without the body playing
> on an off-tuned later afternoon evening sky hoping the virus
> is listening (no, not all they do is replicate or exist) (true
> they have no ears but then... pannalal ghosh perhaps... (true
> enough please note that they have no fundamental vibration)...
> shakuhachi ghost makes all visible, the fleeting moment of
> audible somnolence)...
> 
> "he wants to practice shakuhachi"
> (holeless shakuhachi)
> (shakuhachi)
> (shakuhachi, 1930s jinashi, reverberation)
> * these pieces are no-string pieces for jiari shakuhachi
> - the shakuhachi has already split, but is still playable,
> ..it's after shakuhachi. song was beautiful. I used bone-body
> 1 = shakuhachi; 2 = corona-crown in suspension death
> Today I practice jinashi shakuhachi, and
> I begin focusing more on shakuhachi and will begin and lose
> = shakuhachi = shamisen = shard = sheffer = shimenawa = shinjuu
> A well-made shakuhachi is created from root bamboo, weeks worked
> She plays shakuhachi, whole worlds appear within the moist interior
> and while the shakuhachi is a body-bone, breathing the body, the
> 
> colonies of protozoa in perfect suspension. after the shakuhachi
> is her basket, two robbers approached her. her shakuhachi was made
> from a body-bone, from a bone body, then
> 
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org<mailto:NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org<mailto:NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> 
> 
> --
> =====================================================
> directory http://www.alansondheim.org tel 718-813-3285
> email sondheim ut panix.com<http://panix.com>, sondheim ut gmail.com<http://gmail.com>
> =====================================================
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL: <https://lists.netbehaviour.org/pipermail/netbehaviour/attachments/20200405/a0e7615c/attachment-0001.htm>
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 5
> Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2020 23:56:56 +0000
> From: Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> Message-ID:
> 	<DM5PR0102MB34957CECA4B39743FCBF06C2A5C50 at DM5PR0102MB3495.prod.exchangelabs.com>
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> Reposting this, not sure if it went to the list?  Apologies for the redundancy.  ?
> 
> All best,
> 
> Max
> 
> +++++
> 
> ________________________________
> From: Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com>
> Sent: Sunday, April 5, 2020 4:40 PM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Cc: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> 
> 
> Hi Alan,
> 
> Your postings are often very evocative, so it's fun to reply but usually a fairly uncertain process.  ?
> 
> Some of the elements I missed (thank you for the descriptions) may have been caused by viewing the video on my phone.  I knew the image was filtered in some way, and there was some kind of shadow appearing then diffusing, but there was not too much in the way of clarity.  Viewed again now on my laptop I saw much more of what you described.
> 
> Your texts and images include a lot of expertise, which is valuable and intriguing while also being sometimes complex or difficult.  I don't see this as a flaw at all, but on the contrary as a rich resource and impetus to greater understanding.  As a very rudimentary musician myself I miss a great deal in that sphere alone.  So, my own replies are perhaps doomed to be generic in a way that is important for me to remember, and which does give me pause.
> 
> All very best and thanks again,
> 
> Max
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on behalf of Alan Sondheim via NetBehaviour <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Sent: Sunday, April 5, 2020 3:11 PM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Cc: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> 
> Hi, just a couple of points - first I appreciate your reply greatly.
> Re: Lurie - I'm not in any position to judge his work (which I've looked at); I'd like to read an account of how fundamental concepts are embodied and given priority in pure mathematics. Certainly his constructions come across as baroque; I'm not sure how they apply outside post-category theory (or even within category theory).
> 
> The piece is about contagion, breathing, reversal. The image is a negative of course.
> The shakuhachi is played a couple of inches away from a cold window-pane with the sun in the background.
> Breath from the shakuhachi condenses, then disappears, from the window-pane.
> The breath appears 'like' a dark viral cloud, disappearing. The sound from the instrument produces the cloud which then evaporates. It's a cleansing and a conjuration.
> The shakuhachi is an instrument for meditation. There are only five finger-holes and it's end-blown. It's difficult. I had to hold it awkwardly in order to get the breath to condense in front of the camera, without the instrument appearing in the image.
> So the image seems ab nihilo except in relation to the sound. The sound might be a viral breath itself, a harbinger of death to come.
> Silence cleanses the image of course, evaporation.
> So it's bound to the phenomenology of sound and music, Kristeva's concept of the 'clean and proper body' and so forth.
> Jinashi shakuhachi are an older 'natural' style; mine is from around 1930. It's almost the sound of the bamboo itself. So it's the sound of a natural order in relation to another, the virus.
> The reference to ghost is to somatic ghosting, which I've written a great deal about, and talked about at London ICA etc.
> Panalal Ghosh is one of the most amazing and deep bansari players that ever lived.
> 
> This was all thought out over a sleepless night. So I understand you running in a different direction with it of course; I do feel that the content, whichis/was already heavy, might have been missed, which is of course my own fault, for not spelling out the above?
> 
> Best, Alan, and thank you
> 
> On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 3:49 PM Max Herman via NetBehaviour <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org<mailto:netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>> wrote:
> 
> Hi Alan,
> 
> I like this video, jpg, and writing today.
> 
> I have mild strabismus, and while watching the video on my phone I saw a single eye in the middle of the apartment building, sort of fleeting like that kind of image you have mentioned which is kind of like a morning hallucination.  I forget the term, apophatic?  No, that is something different maybe.  (Will check later; I prefer not to check missing word definitions right away these days.)  I read about the morning hallucination type in a book by Oliver Sacks called Hallucinations, I think.
> 
> In any case, I saw a single eye in the middle of the screen due to strabismus, but it wasn't stable and morphed in and out of Visibility as the colors of the video changed.  As the video progressed, both eyes became visible in normal geometry, and of course normal in the black at the end of the video.  I like images (often like imaginary blueprints in my mind's eye, like bodies, or really, of the set of all bodies, which is to say the original pre-human primate matrix: the set of all bodies in the set of bodies in which my body lives, my group of 20 to 40 linked brains) of apartment buildings recently, in part due to starting reading Georges Perec's Life, a User's Manual as part of my study of Calvino's pre-emptively proposed syllabi Six Memos (Sei Proposte per il Prossimo Millennio).  I dream about apartment building plans sometimes.  They are kind of like grids, matrices, skeletons, or gardens, but with an organic and often organically pathogenic ingredient creeping in around the n
> ooks and crannies perhaps because to be honest math is about equivalences not equality as identity, not about math at all, one might argue if Jacob Lurie is onto anything at Princeton with his new redefinition of all of mathematics based on his Higer Topos Theory of 2009.
> 
> I also like that the bone marrow is part of the immune system, a truly marvelous part if I'm not mistaken, while also being the dietary discovery that the first pre-humans' tools made accessible thus immediately creating our human brains.
> 
> There is also Kafka's story "The Knight of the Bucket," which I haven't read, but should look up and get, but is discussed by Calvino in his reminder or memorandum for our new third millennium "Lightness."  (It may be that in Calvino's composition, the first millennium was that of religion, the second that of the book, and the third, that of the network.)  In the Kafka story, the speaker goes looking for coal in his home city Vienna due to a bitter shortage of heat, out on the street freezing, then, amazingly, floating in the air.  He floats with his bucket above his landlord and landlady, asking them for coal, so that he won't freeze, but floats too high, eventually not being able to hear or speak to them.  The story ends with him floating across the landscape in search of.
> 
> The word "basket" prompted me to think of the Kafka, I'm pretty sure.
> 
> As to the corona, the crown, who is more monarchic, mono-archic, than death itself?  It is the principle of the emptiness of closedness, also symbolized in Calvino by a ring (which caused among other things Charlemagne's mythic necrophilia), its singleness and lack of Multiplicity (the which being Calvino's fifth and last memo because he died himself before writing the sixth, which I hypothesize was to have been about fear, the fear of death, petrifaction, and its corollary value, which I take to be delight, persistent observation and expression summed up by the word Consistency, in the sense of continuing on or not continuing on, which is also of course the comic corollary of the tragedy or tragos-ode, goat-song which arguably was the first practice of "Western Civilization" in pre-ancient Greece).
> 
> Death is a mighty crown which we each get to wear in our own due time, but so is life.
> 
> So, thanks for posting today, it is interesting to hear some Japanese words and concepts, if that is a correct interpretation, a good reminder to self to read up on those.  I know very few if any, the main ones if any being my own bastardized tragos-cycle of wabi-sabi-aware-yugen, taconite- and Teotihuacan-based, which I now have to also look up, but was able to find, link below.
> 
> In any case, here is a marvelous poem from Basho, which today's reflections prompted me to find for the first time:
> 
> 
>          the beginning of furyu
> 
>          this rice-planting
> 
>          song of the north.
> 
> 
> All best,
> 
> Max
> 
> Notes and references:
> 
> Wayback machine wabi-sabi project from 2004, titled "The Four Moods of Furyu"
> https://web.archive.org/web/20091028070421/http://www.geocities.com/genius-2000/furyu.html
> 
> Perec at Wikipedia
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec
> 
> Calvino's six Memos
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium
> 
> Jacob Lurie:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie
> 
> Bone marrow's lymphatic role:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role
> 
> Kafka's Der Kubelreiter:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider
> 
> Bartelby the Scrivener (only known topic of the unfinished Sixth Memo):
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales
> 
> The history of furyu:
> https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/
> 
> [https://shiseidodojo.files.wordpress.com/2010/05/ikeno_taiga_001-mod-1.jpg]<https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
> JAPANESE AESTHETICS: FURYU | Shiseidodojo's Blog<https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
> Ukiyo-z?shi (???? ) or ?books of the floating world? was the first major genus of popular Japanese fiction, by and large written between 1690 and 1770, primarily in Ky?to and ?saka. Ukiyo-z?shi style literature developed from kana-z?shi (???? ) [a type of printed Japanese book that was produced largely in Ky?to between 1600 and 1680, referring to books written in kana ...
> shiseidodojo.wordpress.com<http://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com>
> 
> The Piazza Tales - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales>
> The Piazza Tales is a collection of six short stories by American writer Herman Melville, published by Dix & Edwards in the United States in May 1856 and in Britain in June. Except for the newly written title story, "The Piazza," all of the stories had appeared in Putnam's Monthly in 1853-1855.
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> The Bucket Rider - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider>
> "The Bucket Rider" (German: "Der K?belreiter") is a short story by Franz Kafka, written in 1917. It first appeared in the Prager Presse in 1921 and was published posthumously in Beim Bau der Chinesischen Mauer (Berlin, 1931).The first English translation, by Willa and Edwin Muir, was published by Martin Secker in London in 1933. It also appeared in The Great Wall of China.
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> Bone marrow - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role>
> Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which may be found within the spongy or cancellous portions of bones. In birds and mammals, bone marrow is the primary site of new blood cell production or hematopoiesis. It is composed of hematopoietic cells, marrow adipose tissue, and supportive stromal cells.In adult humans, bone marrow is primarily located in the ribs, vertebrae, sternum, and bones of the ...
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> Jacob Lurie - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie>
> Jacob Lurie's results at International Mathematical Olympiad This article about an American mathematician is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it ...
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> 
> 
> Six Memos for the Next Millennium - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium>
> Six Memos for the Next Millennium (Italian: Lezioni americane. Sei proposte per il prossimo millennio) is a book based on a series of lectures written by Italo Calvino for the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard, but never delivered as Calvino died before leaving Italy.The lectures were originally written in Italian and translated by Patrick Creagh.
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> [https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/78/Georges_Perec.jpg]<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
> Georges Perec - Wikipedia<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
> Georges Perec (born George Peretz) (French: [pe??k, p???k]; 7 March 1936 ? 3 March 1982) was a French novelist, filmmaker, documentalist, and essayist.He was a member of the Oulipo group. His father died as a soldier early in the Second World War and his mother was murdered in the Holocaust, and many of his works deal with absence, loss, and identity, often through word play.
> en.wikipedia.org<http://en.wikipedia.org>
> 
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org<mailto:netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org>> on behalf of Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com<mailto:sondheim at panix.com>>
> Sent: Sunday, April 5, 2020 11:25 AM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org<mailto:netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>>
> Subject: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> 
> 
> 
> shakuhachi ghost
> 
> http://www.alansondheim.org/shakuhachighost.jpg
> https://youtu.be/FAAB7uAm7tg video
> 
> somatic ghost extensions from within without the body playing
> on an off-tuned later afternoon evening sky hoping the virus
> is listening (no, not all they do is replicate or exist) (true
> they have no ears but then... pannalal ghosh perhaps... (true
> enough please note that they have no fundamental vibration)...
> shakuhachi ghost makes all visible, the fleeting moment of
> audible somnolence)...
> 
> "he wants to practice shakuhachi"
> (holeless shakuhachi)
> (shakuhachi)
> (shakuhachi, 1930s jinashi, reverberation)
> * these pieces are no-string pieces for jiari shakuhachi
> - the shakuhachi has already split, but is still playable,
> ..it's after shakuhachi. song was beautiful. I used bone-body
> 1 = shakuhachi; 2 = corona-crown in suspension death
> Today I practice jinashi shakuhachi, and
> I begin focusing more on shakuhachi and will begin and lose
> = shakuhachi = shamisen = shard = sheffer = shimenawa = shinjuu
> A well-made shakuhachi is created from root bamboo, weeks worked
> She plays shakuhachi, whole worlds appear within the moist interior
> and while the shakuhachi is a body-bone, breathing the body, the
> 
> colonies of protozoa in perfect suspension. after the shakuhachi
> is her basket, two robbers approached her. her shakuhachi was made
> from a body-bone, from a bone body, then
> 
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org<mailto:NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org<mailto:NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> 
> 
> --
> =====================================================
> directory http://www.alansondheim.org tel 718-813-3285
> email sondheim ut panix.com<http://panix.com>, sondheim ut gmail.com<http://gmail.com>
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 6
> Date: Sun, 5 Apr 2020 20:02:57 -0400
> From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at gmail.com>
> To: Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com>
> Cc: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
> Message-ID:
> 	<CAO=pi2Cz+n3M9H22-aP15i9VWpqUmc4ks+unPG+2t_rLfx2fxQ at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Hi Max - there's been confusion at my end etc.
> 
> Definitely my video isn't for phones; I can't control that of course, but
> there are details (tiny writing, 'smudges,' etc.) that don't go through
> really on a tiny screen. The same goes for the audio; I often emphasize the
> bass and even sub-bass, which I hear well and have always preferred; these
> don't come through small speakers or earbuds.
> 
> Two things - I do want to say how much I appreciate your replies and
> careful thinking / bringing so many things to bear. (In my case "to bare"
> and sorry for the pun!) And what are you doing musically? What are you
> playing, etc.? I wonder if people on Netbehaviour might be interested in a
> group improvisation sometime?
> 
> Best, Alan, thank you!
> 
> On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 7:56 PM Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> 
>> Hi all,
>> 
>> Reposting this, not sure if it went to the list?  Apologies for the
>> redundancy.  ?
>> 
>> All best,
>> 
>> Max
>> 
>> +++++
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com>
>> *Sent:* Sunday, April 5, 2020 4:40 PM
>> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <
>> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
>> *Cc:* Alan Sondheim <sondheim at gmail.com>
>> *Subject:* Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
>> 
>> 
>> Hi Alan,
>> 
>> Your postings are often very evocative, so it's fun to reply but usually a
>> fairly uncertain process.  ?
>> 
>> Some of the elements I missed (thank you for the descriptions) may have
>> been caused by viewing the video on my phone.  I knew the image was
>> filtered in some way, and there was some kind of shadow appearing then
>> diffusing, but there was not too much in the way of clarity.  Viewed again
>> now on my laptop I saw much more of what you described.
>> 
>> Your texts and images include a lot of expertise, which is valuable and
>> intriguing while also being sometimes complex or difficult.  I don't see
>> this as a flaw at all, but on the contrary as a rich resource and impetus
>> to greater understanding.  As a very rudimentary musician myself I miss a
>> great deal in that sphere alone.  So, my own replies are perhaps doomed to
>> be generic in a way that is important for me to remember, and which does
>> give me pause.
>> 
>> All very best and thanks again,
>> 
>> Max
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on
>> behalf of Alan Sondheim via NetBehaviour <
>> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
>> *Sent:* Sunday, April 5, 2020 3:11 PM
>> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <
>> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
>> *Cc:* Alan Sondheim <sondheim at gmail.com>
>> *Subject:* Re: [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
>> 
>> Hi, just a couple of points - first I appreciate your reply greatly.
>> Re: Lurie - I'm not in any position to judge his work (which I've looked
>> at); I'd like to read an account of how fundamental concepts are embodied
>> and given priority in pure mathematics. Certainly his constructions come
>> across as baroque; I'm not sure how they apply outside post-category theory
>> (or even within category theory).
>> 
>> The piece is about contagion, breathing, reversal. The image is a negative
>> of course.
>> The shakuhachi is played a couple of inches away from a cold window-pane
>> with the sun in the background.
>> Breath from the shakuhachi condenses, then disappears, from the
>> window-pane.
>> The breath appears 'like' a dark viral cloud, disappearing. The sound from
>> the instrument produces the cloud which then evaporates. It's a cleansing
>> and a conjuration.
>> The shakuhachi is an instrument for meditation. There are only five
>> finger-holes and it's end-blown. It's difficult. I had to hold it awkwardly
>> in order to get the breath to condense in front of the camera, without the
>> instrument appearing in the image.
>> So the image seems ab nihilo except in relation to the sound. The sound
>> might be a viral breath itself, a harbinger of death to come.
>> Silence cleanses the image of course, evaporation.
>> So it's bound to the phenomenology of sound and music, Kristeva's concept
>> of the 'clean and proper body' and so forth.
>> Jinashi shakuhachi are an older 'natural' style; mine is from around 1930.
>> It's almost the sound of the bamboo itself. So it's the sound of a natural
>> order in relation to another, the virus.
>> The reference to ghost is to somatic ghosting, which I've written a great
>> deal about, and talked about at London ICA etc.
>> Panalal Ghosh is one of the most amazing and deep bansari players that
>> ever lived.
>> 
>> This was all thought out over a sleepless night. So I understand you
>> running in a different direction with it of course; I do feel that the
>> content, whichis/was already heavy, might have been missed, which is of
>> course my own fault, for not spelling out the above?
>> 
>> Best, Alan, and thank you
>> 
>> On Sun, Apr 5, 2020 at 3:49 PM Max Herman via NetBehaviour <
>> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org> wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> Hi Alan,
>> 
>> I like this video, jpg, and writing today.
>> 
>> I have mild strabismus, and while watching the video on my phone I saw a
>> single eye in the middle of the apartment building, sort of fleeting like
>> that kind of image you have mentioned which is kind of like a morning
>> hallucination.  I forget the term, apophatic?  No, that is something
>> different maybe.  (Will check later; I prefer not to check missing word
>> definitions right away these days.)  I read about the morning hallucination
>> type in a book by Oliver Sacks called *Hallucinations*, I think.
>> 
>> In any case, I saw a single eye in the middle of the screen due to
>> strabismus, but it wasn't stable and morphed in and out of Visibility as
>> the colors of the video changed.  As the video progressed, both eyes became
>> visible in normal geometry, and of course normal in the black at the end of
>> the video.  I like images (often like imaginary blueprints in my mind's
>> eye, like bodies, or really, of the set of all bodies, which is to say the
>> original pre-human primate matrix: the set of all bodies in the set of
>> bodies in which my body lives, my group of 20 to 40 linked brains) of
>> apartment buildings recently, in part due to starting reading Georges
>> Perec's *Life, a User's Manual* as part of my study of Calvino's
>> pre-emptively proposed syllabi *Six Memos* (*Sei Proposte per il Prossimo
>> Millennio*).  I dream about apartment building plans sometimes.  They are
>> kind of like grids, matrices, skeletons, or gardens, but with an organic
>> and often organically pathogenic ingredient creeping in around the nooks
>> and crannies perhaps because to be honest math is about equivalences not
>> equality as identity, not about math at all, one might argue if Jacob Lurie
>> is onto anything at Princeton with his new redefinition of all of
>> mathematics based on his *Higer Topos Theory* of 2009.
>> 
>> I also like that the bone marrow is part of the immune system, a truly
>> marvelous part if I'm not mistaken, while also being the dietary discovery
>> that the first pre-humans' tools made accessible thus immediately creating
>> our human brains.
>> 
>> There is also Kafka's story "The Knight of the Bucket," which I haven't
>> read, but should look up and get, but is discussed by Calvino in his
>> reminder or memorandum for our new third millennium "Lightness."  (It may
>> be that in Calvino's composition, the first millennium was that of
>> religion, the second that of the book, and the third, that of the
>> network.)  In the Kafka story, the speaker goes looking for coal in his
>> home city Vienna due to a bitter shortage of heat, out on the street
>> freezing, then, amazingly, floating in the air.  He floats with his bucket
>> above his landlord and landlady, asking them for coal, so that he won't
>> freeze, but floats too high, eventually not being able to hear or speak to
>> them.  The story ends with him floating across the landscape in search of.
>> 
>> The word "basket" prompted me to think of the Kafka, I'm pretty sure.
>> 
>> As to the corona, the crown, who is more monarchic, mono-archic, than
>> death itself?  It is the principle of the emptiness of closedness, also
>> symbolized in Calvino by a ring (which caused among other things
>> Charlemagne's mythic necrophilia), its singleness and lack of Multiplicity
>> (the which being Calvino's fifth and last memo because he died himself
>> before writing the sixth, which I hypothesize was to have been about fear,
>> the fear of death, petrifaction, and its corollary value, which I take to
>> be delight, persistent observation and expression summed up by the word
>> Consistency, in the sense of continuing on or not continuing on, which is
>> also of course the comic corollary of the tragedy or tragos-ode, goat-song
>> which arguably was the first practice of "Western Civilization" in
>> pre-ancient Greece).
>> 
>> Death is a mighty crown which we each get to wear in our own due time, but
>> so is life.
>> 
>> So, thanks for posting today, it is interesting to hear some Japanese
>> words and concepts, if that is a correct interpretation, a good reminder to
>> self to read up on those.  I know very few if any, the main ones if any
>> being my own bastardized tragos-cycle of wabi-sabi-aware-yugen, taconite-
>> and Teotihuacan-based, which I now have to also look up, but was able to
>> find, link below.
>> 
>> In any case, here is a marvelous poem from Basho, which today's
>> reflections prompted me to find for the first time:
>> 
>> 
>>          the beginning of furyu
>> 
>>          this rice-planting
>> 
>>          song of the north.
>> 
>> 
>> All best,
>> 
>> Max
>> 
>> Notes and references:
>> 
>> Wayback machine wabi-sabi project from 2004, titled "The Four Moods of
>> Furyu"
>> 
>> https://web.archive.org/web/20091028070421/http://www.geocities.com/genius-2000/furyu.html
>> 
>> Perec at Wikipedia
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec
>> 
>> Calvino's six Memos
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium
>> 
>> Jacob Lurie:
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie
>> 
>> Bone marrow's lymphatic role:
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role
>> 
>> Kafka's Der Kubelreiter:
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider
>> 
>> Bartelby the Scrivener (only known topic of the unfinished Sixth Memo):
>> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales
>> 
>> The history of furyu:
>> https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/
>> 
>> <https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
>> JAPANESE AESTHETICS: FURYU | Shiseidodojo's Blog
>> <https://shiseidodojo.wordpress.com/2010/05/09/japanese-aesthetics-furyu/>
>> Ukiyo-z?shi (???? ) or ?books of the floating world? was the first major
>> genus of popular Japanese fiction, by and large written between 1690 and
>> 1770, primarily in Ky?to and ?saka. Ukiyo-z?shi style literature developed
>> from kana-z?shi (???? ) [a type of printed Japanese book that was produced
>> largely in Ky?to between 1600 and 1680, referring to books written in kana
>> ...
>> shiseidodojo.wordpress.com
>> 
>> The Piazza Tales - Wikipedia
>> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Piazza_Tales>
>> The Piazza Tales is a collection of six short stories by American writer
>> Herman Melville, published by Dix & Edwards in the United States in May
>> 1856 and in Britain in June. Except for the newly written title story, "The
>> Piazza," all of the stories had appeared in Putnam's Monthly in 1853-1855.
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> The Bucket Rider - Wikipedia
>> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Bucket_Rider>
>> "The Bucket Rider" (German: "Der K?belreiter") is a short story by Franz
>> Kafka, written in 1917. It first appeared in the Prager Presse in 1921 and
>> was published posthumously in Beim Bau der Chinesischen Mauer (Berlin,
>> 1931).The first English translation, by Willa and Edwin Muir, was published
>> by Martin Secker in London in 1933. It also appeared in The Great Wall of
>> China.
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> Bone marrow - Wikipedia
>> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow#Lymphatic_role>
>> Bone marrow is a semi-solid tissue which may be found within the spongy or
>> cancellous portions of bones. In birds and mammals, bone marrow is the
>> primary site of new blood cell production or hematopoiesis. It is composed
>> of hematopoietic cells, marrow adipose tissue, and supportive stromal
>> cells.In adult humans, bone marrow is primarily located in the ribs,
>> vertebrae, sternum, and bones of the ...
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> Jacob Lurie - Wikipedia <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacob_Lurie>
>> Jacob Lurie's results at International Mathematical Olympiad This article
>> about an American mathematician is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by
>> expanding it ...
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Six Memos for the Next Millennium - Wikipedia
>> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Six_Memos_for_the_Next_Millennium>
>> Six Memos for the Next Millennium (Italian: Lezioni americane. Sei
>> proposte per il prossimo millennio) is a book based on a series of lectures
>> written by Italo Calvino for the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard,
>> but never delivered as Calvino died before leaving Italy.The lectures were
>> originally written in Italian and translated by Patrick Creagh.
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
>> Georges Perec - Wikipedia <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Perec>
>> Georges Perec (born George Peretz) (French: [pe??k, p???k]; 7 March 1936 ?
>> 3 March 1982) was a French novelist, filmmaker, documentalist, and
>> essayist.He was a member of the Oulipo group. His father died as a soldier
>> early in the Second World War and his mother was murdered in the Holocaust,
>> and many of his works deal with absence, loss, and identity, often through
>> word play.
>> en.wikipedia.org
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on
>> behalf of Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
>> *Sent:* Sunday, April 5, 2020 11:25 AM
>> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <
>> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
>> *Subject:* [NetBehaviour] shakuhachi ghost
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> shakuhachi ghost
>> 
>> http://www.alansondheim.org/shakuhachighost.jpg
>> https://youtu.be/FAAB7uAm7tg video
>> 
>> somatic ghost extensions from within without the body playing
>> on an off-tuned later afternoon evening sky hoping the virus
>> is listening (no, not all they do is replicate or exist) (true
>> they have no ears but then... pannalal ghosh perhaps... (true
>> enough please note that they have no fundamental vibration)...
>> shakuhachi ghost makes all visible, the fleeting moment of
>> audible somnolence)...
>> 
>> "he wants to practice shakuhachi"
>> (holeless shakuhachi)
>> (shakuhachi)
>> (shakuhachi, 1930s jinashi, reverberation)
>> * these pieces are no-string pieces for jiari shakuhachi
>> - the shakuhachi has already split, but is still playable,
>> ..it's after shakuhachi. song was beautiful. I used bone-body
>> 1 = shakuhachi; 2 = corona-crown in suspension death
>> Today I practice jinashi shakuhachi, and
>> I begin focusing more on shakuhachi and will begin and lose
>> = shakuhachi = shamisen = shard = sheffer = shimenawa = shinjuu
>> A well-made shakuhachi is created from root bamboo, weeks worked
>> She plays shakuhachi, whole worlds appear within the moist interior
>> and while the shakuhachi is a body-bone, breathing the body, the
>> 
>> colonies of protozoa in perfect suspension. after the shakuhachi
>> is her basket, two robbers approached her. her shakuhachi was made
>> from a body-bone, from a bone body, then
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> NetBehaviour mailing list
>> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
>> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>> _______________________________________________
>> NetBehaviour mailing list
>> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
>> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> --
>> *=====================================================*
>> 
>> *directory http://www.alansondheim.org <http://www.alansondheim.org> tel
>> 718-813-3285 **email sondheim ut panix.com <http://panix.com>, sondheim
>> ut gmail.com <http://gmail.com>*
>> *=====================================================*
>> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> *=====================================================*
> 
> *directory http://www.alansondheim.org <http://www.alansondheim.org> tel
> 718-813-3285**email sondheim ut panix.com <http://panix.com>, sondheim ut
> gmail.com <http://gmail.com>*
> *=====================================================*
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 7
> Date: Mon, 6 Apr 2020 10:21:34 +0100
> From: Graziano Milano <grazmaster at googlemail.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Invitation to join in dialogue, COVID Net
> 	Art discussion
> Message-ID:
> 	<CAL5jRUWKfRKS7LMh71fccKbir4DmS-a35zTETAM7AJp7oifu4A at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> *?Zoombombing?* info are now on wikipedia:
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoombombing
> 
> On Fri, 3 Apr 2020 at 16:31, Max Herman via NetBehaviour <
> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org> wrote:
> 
>> 
>> Hi Danielle,
>> 
>> These sound fun, I will try to check one out!
>> 
>> I think the relevance of Leonardo da Vinci and his fabulous integration of
>> art and science, indeed of all the arts and all the sciences, couldn't be
>> more essential for the crisis of Covid-19 (a virus appearing during the
>> year of Leonardo's 500th anniversary celebrations which I was fortunately
>> able to visit in Florence last June).
>> 
>> How we build on and continue Leonardo's legacy may be crucial to how well
>> the planet will cope with the pandemic.
>> 
>> Last July I got the strange idea, after reading a lot of Calvino's *Six
>> Memos*, Giunti's "Decoding Leonardo" edition of the Codex Leicester
>> (bought in Florence at the Galileo Museum's Leonardo exhibit), and a book
>> on Leonardo's library, that the Mona Lisa is itself best understood as a
>> work of network art, specifically, as a mindfulness network map of human
>> and planetary history.
>> 
>> How did this viewing arise?  It occurred to me on the airplane while
>> returning from a vacation in California, and was perhaps prompted by
>> Calvino's mention in *Six Memos for the Next Millennium*, in Exactitude
>> pp. 77-80, of Leonardo's highly poetic and visual description of a
>> sea-going dinosaur in the Codex Atlanticus, which Calvino felt Leonardo
>> used as "a symbol of the solemn force of nature."
>> 
>> For whatever reason, either the Calvino, or my recent visit to Florence,
>> or my inability (on the same trip!) to visit the actual Mona Lisa at the
>> Louvre because we visited on the day of the 1-day strike to protest the
>> excessive number of tourists, I was really trying to engage with the Mona
>> Lisa on that flight home from California.  I had realized that I thought
>> about the ML more than I actually looked at it, and should look at it some
>> more (if only out of respect for the artist on his 500th anniversary year).
>> 
>> What I saw in my mind's eye, looking at the ML in reproduction, was an
>> interactive temporal and cognitive map.  This was partly prompted by my
>> attempt to "meet the gaze" of the painting, not a quick glance but a
>> sustained engagement.  To do this, I used a bit of mindfulness meditation
>> while viewing it.  I tried to just look, without analyzing, for a sustained
>> time, say five minutes or so.  I appreciated and felt how the ML's facial
>> expression changed along with my internal mental state or attitude,
>> "responding" in a kindly, admonishing, or neutral depending on my inner
>> sense of my own viewing agency.  I saw this as a kind of mute dialogue, the
>> image being designed by Leonardo so that an intelligence or knowledge of
>> his own could greet and engage with something similar in myself.  This I
>> felt to be a cycle, like breathing, not a one-and-done; what in yoga
>> sometimes is called the namaste or mutual recognition.
>> 
>> This way of viewing the painting felt very rich and real to me, in an
>> almost shocking way.  It seemed like a true step forward.  So, I looked to
>> the background of the painting for clues.  I saw the bleak and empty
>> landscape on the left background, showing the tectonic erosion as mentioned
>> in the Giunti Codex Leicester pp. 58-59, and a river flow as on p. 14
>> (detail of the ML) and pp. 32-34.  This of course also elicited images of
>> vortices of water, described in the Giunti thus:  "The spiral is one of the
>> shapes of water that most attracts Leonardo (fig. 10), in his eyes it
>> represents one of the greatest manifestations of the power of water,
>> because the vortices can dig the bottom of the rivers like augers" (p.19).
>> 
>> I'd known for a while that the horizon line in the ML background is
>> disjunct on the left and the right, but why?  It appeared to me that the
>> main difference was that the right side was a bit more complex, but most
>> strikingly, it had a human-built structure: a bridge.  This had to be a
>> major factor -- it was practically the only object in the whole background,
>> other than mists, flowing water, and primordial rocks.  Then the visual
>> "shock" or rupture hit me, that the bridge flowed seamlessly into a vortex,
>> a twisting braid of the sitter's shawl, bringing me back instantly from the
>> mists of geologic time to the sitter's garment, then body, then face.
>> 
>> This struck me as consequential.  The sitter's garment is dignified, but
>> far from gaudy or splendid.  It serves mainly to accent the hands (for me
>> the most lush and gorgeous part of the picture apart from the eyes), the
>> heart (simple and meditative), and the face.  I couldn't have imagined a
>> more shocking and indeed blasting return to the gaze from an
>> almost-infinite distance in time and space.  I cannot but confess this
>> changed my life forever.  I scribbled on a piece of paper so I wouldn't
>> forget, and showed it to my wife who was watching a movie on the airplane
>> video system: "I figured out what the Mona Lisa means!"  Whatever this tale
>> might mean to anyone else, it changed me irreversibly.  In that moment I
>> came to love Leonardo and Florence, Galileo and the Arno, in an entirely
>> new and complete way.  A friend and true kindred spirit, a colleague, a
>> companion, a teacher.  Something like the sun setting behind the Duomo as
>> viewed from Michelangelo's piazzale, completely overcrowded yes but still
>> there.  Both a haunting question and a generous gift.
>> 
>> But I wax too poetical.  The epiphany was beautiful yes, and with memories
>> of Cinque Terre truly helped me bond with the land where Calvino lived.
>> But like all epiphanies do and should, it faded and settled to something
>> more quiet.  Was it real, at all, and if so, how?  Was it a major load of
>> BS?
>> 
>> I've tried to research this, to ask others if they can see these visuals,
>> or sense this interactive gaze.  So far no luck, but the hypothesis still
>> interests me.  I have found references by Leonardo in his notebooks to
>> science and learning as garments however, which to me is a fairly exact
>> corroboration.  The bridge represents the works of art and science, which
>> clothe humanity, but are not to be dominating or prescriptive over
>> experience, which Leonardo called his mistress, witness, judge, and
>> champion, and which I believe to be instantiated in the intersubjective
>> gaze we can share in real time with the painting.  To see it though depends
>> on our being present.  This relates to mindfulness and present-moment
>> awareness, based on the cycle of breathing, a relatively new frontier in
>> neuroscience which I believe must inform our approach to aesthetics and to
>> history, the history of both art and science, if we are to truly progress.
>> After all, how could we possible progress without being present?  ?
>> 
>> This is my speculative hypothesis on the nature of the Mona Lisa: a map of
>> evolutionary and geologic time; of the history of art, engineering,
>> science, and technology; an ethos balancing the human with the built; and a
>> directive for each of us to simply be present as our starting point, goal,
>> and locus of individuality capable of connective unity.  This is a map
>> designed to help us balance, to understand, to help, indeed to heal.
>> 
>> Therefore I see this map as a human one, a transformative
>> network-aesthetic process tailor made as it were for this moment of
>> anthropocene crisis that bridges the medical, scientific, economic, and
>> aesthetic realms.
>> 
>> Very best regards and thank you for all the great work Leonardo does,
>> 
>> Max
>> 
>> Notes:
>> Calvino, Italo.  Six Memos for the Next Millennium.  Vintage, 1996.
>> Laurenza, Domenico.  The Codex Leceister: Leonardo da Vinci.  Giunti:
>> Decoding Leonardo.  2018.
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on
>> behalf of Danielle Siembieda via NetBehaviour <
>> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
>> *Sent:* Friday, April 3, 2020 1:57 AM
>> *Cc:* Danielle Siembieda <dsiembieda at hotmail.com>
>> *Subject:* [NetBehaviour] Invitation to join in dialogue, COVID Net Art
>> discussion
>> 
>> 
>> Hi there, I wanted to share a couple of important things Leonardo is doing
>> in the next week. I thought you'd like to join us.
>> 
>> *Coffee and Cocktails - A Social Connecting Space in your timezone.*
>> 
>> 
>> They are on Mondays and Thursdays.* Here is a link with details about
>> times, <https://www.leonardo.info/civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=489>* when
>> you register it will email you the private Zoom room information. Our next
>> one is Thursday morning at 9:00 AM San Francisco time hosted by Leonardo's
>> Managing Editor Erica Hruby.
>> 
>> 
>> I also wanted to make sure you know about and are able to attend a special
>> panel discussion for a net art exhibition sponsored by the Chronos Art
>> Center and Rhizome at the New Museum in response to COVID-19. We=Link:
>> Ten Easy Pieces press release and ten partner organizations can be found
>> here <https://www.leonardo.info/welink-ten-easy-pieces>. The artworks are
>> currently on the Chronus site here  <http://we-link.chronusartcenter.org/>and
>> will soon be on the Leonardo site archived.
>> 
>> 
>> We hope you will join us for an interactive panel on Monday, April 6 at
>> 5:00 San Francisco time. *Details are and RSVP here
>> <https://www.leonardo.info/civicrm/event/info?reset=1&id=490>. We will also
>> share this live on Facebook
>> <https://www.facebook.com/events/643544219757375/>.*
>> 
>> 
>> One last thing, we are in the midst of collaborating with our LASER Hosts
>> around the world for a global LASER Event. We will announce more soon.
>> 
>> 
>> Best,
>> 
>> Danielle Siembieda
>> Managing Director
>> Leonardo/ISAST
>> 
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> NetBehaviour mailing list
>> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
>> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>> 
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