[NetBehaviour] Ethernet Orchestra generative web app

Roger Mills roger at eartrumpet.org
Sat Mar 14 04:26:20 CET 2020


Hi everyone,
A bit of fun if you are in self-quarantine or some non-fiscal stimulus.

Open up the new Ethernet Orchestra generative web app developed by Thomas Park for our recently released album, Oceans between Sound. 

The app randomly selects and loops track samples to create an evolving generative soundscape, accompanied by morphing images and video of the oceans and waterways from which the album track titles are named. 

You can also choose to manually mix these generative streams in the mixer bar beneath the interface for further indeterminate listening! 

Save the link below to open as a default browser window providing a unique screensaver.

https://www.thomasparksolutions5.com/ <https://www.thomasparksolutions5.com/>

Enjoy

—
Roger Mills 

http://www.eartrumpet.org
http://ethernetorchestra.net
http://telesound.net

> On 13 Mar 2020, at 10:00 pm, netbehaviour-request at lists.netbehaviour.org wrote:
> 
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> Today's Topics:
> 
>   1. re-post about COVID-19 from another list (Max Herman)
>   2. last re-post today (Max Herman)
>   3. Re: Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the Young People
>      (Max Herman)
>   4. Re: Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the Young People
>      (Edward Picot)
>   5. Re: Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the Young People
>      (Alan Sondheim)
>   6. Missouri Echo (Alan Sondheim)
>   7. Re: Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the Young People
>      (Michael Szpakowski)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Thu, 12 Mar 2020 17:56:46 +0000
> From: Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: [NetBehaviour] re-post about COVID-19 from another list
> Message-ID:
> 	<DM5PR0102MB34953A39A3878EADD5AF25D4A5FD0 at DM5PR0102MB3495.prod.exchangelabs.com>
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> 
> Hi all,
> 
> I think it is worth considering the ancient "goat song" in this current crisis.
> 
> The goat song started out as a dance people did in ancient Greece when sacrificing a goat in order to get the gods' help in a crisis.  They danced together and sang words together to help the group "get on the same page."  Another aspect was to do the goat-song-dance for the grape harvest, when things were good, more like comedy in that the characters in such settings would survive and laugh rather than die.
> 
> The main crises in ancient times were plague, and its political sibling, tyranny.  These were the topics of the goat-song: Classical Greek ????????, contracted from trag(o)-aoidi? = "goat song", which comes from tragos = "he-goat" and aeidein = "to sing" (cf. "ode").
> 
> Here is one interpretation we might want to consider somewhat:
> 
> "Anyway, arising from an improvisatory beginning (both tragedy and comedy?tragedy from the leaders of the dithyramb, and comedy from the leaders of the phallic processions which even now continue as a custom in many of our cities), [tragedy] grew little by little, as [the poets] developed whatever [new part] of it had appeared; and, passing through many changes, tragedy came to a halt, since it had attained its own nature."  ??Poetics IV, 1449a 10?15[18]
> 
> Cycles don't come to halts, nor do paths, nor do networks.
> 
> "It is well-known that the 'Age of Pericles' was also the Golden Age of Greek tragedy, whose evolution we can follow from Aeschylus' Persians in 471 BC to Sophocles' Oedipus at Colonus, staged in 401.  It is less well-known that this is also the Golden Age of Greek medicine.  The Greek doctor Hippocrates, who was born in 460 BC and died around 370 BC,  originated from the island of Cos and came from a family of Aesclepiads.  If we may believe Plato, his younger contemporary, by the end of the fifth century his fame as a doctor was already similar to that of Polyctetes of Argos or Phidias of Athens as sculptors."
> 
> https://brill.com/view/book/9789004232549/B9789004232549-s005.xml
> 
> All best,
> 
> Max
> 
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Thu, 12 Mar 2020 18:11:46 +0000
> From: Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: [NetBehaviour] last re-post today
> Message-ID:
> 	<DM5PR0102MB34950C00EBEA2DD1094C4FE8A5FD0 at DM5PR0102MB3495.prod.exchangelabs.com>
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> 
> Here they call it COVID-19 which I prefer as a name.  I had an interesting short conversation at a standup pizza gathering with extended family last weekend.  I said, "I wish I knew more biology so I could understand what the hell is going on.  What even is a virus?  What do they do?"  One person, young, who studies bogs, said "They aren't even alive, they're just this floating stuff that attacks and hijacks our cells."  This made me think of shadows, demons, and ghosts.  We talked about "they are the undead."  (This reminds me now of the native American term "indeh" for the dead.)  Then I had an image of something like flaking skin or paper in a copy machine, little bits that floating around and goofed up the printing plans.  Then I thought this was like a cloud-mirror or fugue-plate of unintended consequence itself, the inevitable side effect of events happening in a complex yet finite system.  A bit like static cling, but with biotoxic inflections.  I was reminded of a word I lear
> ned recently, "abiogenic."
> 
> +++++
> 
> Hi James,
> 
> Complexity is a huge factor I agree, for human history writ large but yes also for various economic models.
> 
> In a way, both unregulated free markets and excessive central planning are maladaptive, sort of like genetic inbreeding that causes fragility.  The all-or-nothing of Marx v. Smith debate is rather 18th c., frankly reminiscent of antique doctrinal and liturgical warfare.  Networks in nature mix both.  One of my favorite articles of late is:
> ?Integral feedback control is at the core of task allocation and resilience of insect societies.?  Link:  https://www.pnas.org/content/115/52/13180
> 
> Network theory is the key, but it has to get over its digital and cyber fixations as well as its cozy theoretical cocoon and gold-fever buffoonery -- we have to live this stuff!  It was here, analog, in cells and brains long before the first PC or printing press.  The first cave paintings and guttural utterances were about it, and were it.
> 
> As we live daily today, network thinking and practice have to be working and evolving at all levels and locales.  You cover your sneeze, I cover mine; don't sell the wild fowl at the market next to the domestic fowl.  It's all network reality.  They call it network medicine in cases like we have today, but just like in category theory once you start talking about relationships rather than objects as the locus of activity you need to go "all the way up" (and as Hemingway said only bullfighters ever live their lives all the way up).  In category theory and the new math of equivalence they call it "infinity categories."  This has a rich heritage however in Ovid and Lucretius plus most indigenous henges and origin myths.  It also means we have to flip a large complex system-pancake; we have to do network medicine, network economics, network math, network literature, network art, network physics, network elementary art education, network cooking dinner, and we have to do them all all at o
> nce.
> 
> But we don't have to be perfect or pure.  Just apply reasonable amounts of network thinking to all spheres (art/literature/science/selfhood etc.) in just proportion, what the ancient Greeks called "dike," with reasonable consistency (of which we are all a priori capable) and all manner of thing shall be well.
> 
> Today is an important day to remember the Hippocratic Ethos.  Smith wrote that without moral judgment capitalism cannot function, and socialism can also take a lesson from Hippocrates.  This alone is enough to put the battle to rest a bit or at least on hold, but we ought also to ponder mayhaps the dicta "physician heal thyself" and "in this the patient must minister unto himself."
> 
> My other fragmentary hope of late is for Bernie to be like the Hulk and join the Avengers.  ?
> 
> All very best to all,
> 
> Max
> 
> +++++
> 
> Hi Eric,
> 
> I cannot recall hearing of schizoanalysis and hesitate to look it up via internet search (how many psychic viruses does that habit create I wonder?) but I think I get the gist.  I have always been phobic about certain theorists and am living out the experimental hypothesis that what is worthwhile in what they wrote can reach me just fine indirectly, by other people and writers; it's a filtration experiment like tracking groundwater migration.
> 
> By way of answer, I'd like to type out the following passage I read today on the bus in to work, from a paper book:
> 
> "At certain moments I felt that the entire world was turning into stone: a slow petrifaction, more or less advanced depending on people and places but one that spared no aspect of life.  It was as if no one could escape the inexorable stare of Medusa.  The only hero able to cut off Medusa's head is Perseus, who flies with winged sandals; Perseus, who does not turn his gaze on the face of the Gorgon but only upon her image reflected in his bronze shield.  Thus Perseus comes to my aid even at this moment, just as I too am about to be caught in a vise of stone -- which happens every time I try to speak about my own past.  Better to let my talk be composed of images from mythology."
> 
> All very best as the world lives its life!
> 
> Max
> 
> +++++
> 
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Thu, 12 Mar 2020 18:18:02 +0000
> From: Max Herman <maxnmherman at hotmail.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and
> 	the Young People
> Message-ID:
> 	<DM5PR0102MB3495B070B27E6FCCF3BCA786A5FD0 at DM5PR0102MB3495.prod.exchangelabs.com>
> 	
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
> 
> 
> Good poetry here!
> 
> Reminds me of one of these in a way:
> 
> https://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices/exhibition/healing-ways/medicine-ways/medicine-wheel.html
> 
> 
> ________________________________
> From: NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on behalf of Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 9:37 PM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: [NetBehaviour] Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the Young People
> 
> 
> 
> Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the Young People
> 
> http://www.alansondheim.org/why.png
> some young and old people maybe
> 
> Old people remember wood and the hardness and softness of trees.
> Young people know images of trees and their solarization.
> Old people remember air and history.
> Young people know breathing and the annihilation of history.
> Old people remember the transition from the inertness of the
> world and its descriptions to the mapping of the world and the
> absence of the world.
> Young people know the description of the world down to the level
> of the bit, byte, and pixel.
> Old people know the transition is history and possesses its own
> inertness.
> Young people know the only horizon is that of the imminent future
> and its denouement.
> Old people remember wilderness and animals.
> Young people know classifications, sequencing, crispr, and the
> insertion of lineages into classifications, sequencing, and crispr.
> Old people remember tuning the airwaves full of sound and sight.
> Young people know the imminence of the screen and its control.
> Old people remember immanence.
> Young people know imminence.
> Old people know the tuning of the world and the care taken with
> that tuning as slaughter always approaches in the brutality of
> war, plague, and cartels.
> Young people know the incessant annihilation of the world and its
> incessant recovery.
> Old people remember the fecundity of resources.
> Young people know the horizon of scarcity and armageddon.
> Old people remember the materiality of the abacus and sliderule.
> Young people know the immateriality of the cellphone.
> Old people remember the individual.
> Young people know the projection of others.
> Old people remember the map.
> Young people know the directions and directives.
> Old people know the horror of the world.
> Young people know the world and the horror of the world.
> Old people and young people know this isn't funny.
> And I'm a comedian.
> 
> _______________________________________________
> NetBehaviour mailing list
> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
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> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Thu, 12 Mar 2020 19:56:50 +0000
> From: Edward Picot <julian.lesaux at gmail.com>
> To: netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and
> 	the Young People
> Message-ID: <835d8646-e654-8bfa-54cc-19a799804bc8 at edwardpicot.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"; Format="flowed"
> 
> Yes, I like this too. And I also like your post about the goat-song and 
> Greek tragedy, Max.
> 
> Edward
> 
> 
> On 12/03/2020 18:18, Max Herman via NetBehaviour wrote:
>> 
>> Good poetry here!
>> 
>> Reminds me of one of these in a way:
>> 
>> https://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices/exhibition/healing-ways/medicine-ways/medicine-wheel.html
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>> *From:* NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on 
>> behalf of Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, March 11, 2020 9:37 PM
>> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity 
>> <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
>> *Subject:* [NetBehaviour] Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the 
>> Young People
>> 
>> 
>> Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the Young People
>> 
>> http://www.alansondheim.org/why.png
>> some young and old people maybe
>> 
>> Old people remember wood and the hardness and softness of trees.
>> Young people know images of trees and their solarization.
>> Old people remember air and history.
>> Young people know breathing and the annihilation of history.
>> Old people remember the transition from the inertness of the
>> world and its descriptions to the mapping of the world and the
>> absence of the world.
>> Young people know the description of the world down to the level
>> of the bit, byte, and pixel.
>> Old people know the transition is history and possesses its own
>> inertness.
>> Young people know the only horizon is that of the imminent future
>> and its denouement.
>> Old people remember wilderness and animals.
>> Young people know classifications, sequencing, crispr, and the
>> insertion of lineages into classifications, sequencing, and crispr.
>> Old people remember tuning the airwaves full of sound and sight.
>> Young people know the imminence of the screen and its control.
>> Old people remember immanence.
>> Young people know imminence.
>> Old people know the tuning of the world and the care taken with
>> that tuning as slaughter always approaches in the brutality of
>> war, plague, and cartels.
>> Young people know the incessant annihilation of the world and its
>> incessant recovery.
>> Old people remember the fecundity of resources.
>> Young people know the horizon of scarcity and armageddon.
>> Old people remember the materiality of the abacus and sliderule.
>> Young people know the immateriality of the cellphone.
>> Old people remember the individual.
>> Young people know the projection of others.
>> Old people remember the map.
>> Young people know the directions and directives.
>> Old people know the horror of the world.
>> Young people know the world and the horror of the world.
>> Old people and young people know this isn't funny.
>> And I'm a comedian.
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> NetBehaviour mailing list
>> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
>> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> NetBehaviour mailing list
>> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
>> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
> 
> 
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 5
> Date: Thu, 12 Mar 2020 17:44:44 -0400
> From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at gmail.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and
> 	the Young People
> Message-ID:
> 	<CAO=pi2Dk=Ty-Jss_c9pUmH+LN8f5GOsapDLnvP-gAsQh9vSv3g at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> of course thanks greatly!
> 
> Best, Alan
> 
> On Thu, Mar 12, 2020 at 4:06 PM Edward Picot via NetBehaviour <
> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org> wrote:
> 
>> Yes, I like this too. And I also like your post about the goat-song and
>> Greek tragedy, Max.
>> 
>> Edward
>> 
>> 
>> On 12/03/2020 18:18, Max Herman via NetBehaviour wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> Good poetry here!
>> 
>> Reminds me of one of these in a way:
>> 
>> 
>> https://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices/exhibition/healing-ways/medicine-ways/medicine-wheel.html
>> 
>> 
>> ------------------------------
>> *From:* NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org>
>> <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on behalf of Alan Sondheim
>> <sondheim at panix.com> <sondheim at panix.com>
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, March 11, 2020 9:37 PM
>> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
>> <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
>> <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
>> *Subject:* [NetBehaviour] Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the
>> Young People
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the Young People
>> 
>> http://www.alansondheim.org/why.png
>> some young and old people maybe
>> 
>> Old people remember wood and the hardness and softness of trees.
>> Young people know images of trees and their solarization.
>> Old people remember air and history.
>> Young people know breathing and the annihilation of history.
>> Old people remember the transition from the inertness of the
>> world and its descriptions to the mapping of the world and the
>> absence of the world.
>> Young people know the description of the world down to the level
>> of the bit, byte, and pixel.
>> Old people know the transition is history and possesses its own
>> inertness.
>> Young people know the only horizon is that of the imminent future
>> and its denouement.
>> Old people remember wilderness and animals.
>> Young people know classifications, sequencing, crispr, and the
>> insertion of lineages into classifications, sequencing, and crispr.
>> Old people remember tuning the airwaves full of sound and sight.
>> Young people know the imminence of the screen and its control.
>> Old people remember immanence.
>> Young people know imminence.
>> Old people know the tuning of the world and the care taken with
>> that tuning as slaughter always approaches in the brutality of
>> war, plague, and cartels.
>> Young people know the incessant annihilation of the world and its
>> incessant recovery.
>> Old people remember the fecundity of resources.
>> Young people know the horizon of scarcity and armageddon.
>> Old people remember the materiality of the abacus and sliderule.
>> Young people know the immateriality of the cellphone.
>> Old people remember the individual.
>> Young people know the projection of others.
>> Old people remember the map.
>> Young people know the directions and directives.
>> Old people know the horror of the world.
>> Young people know the world and the horror of the world.
>> Old people and young people know this isn't funny.
>> And I'm a comedian.
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> NetBehaviour mailing list
>> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
>> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> NetBehaviour mailing listNetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.orghttps://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>> 
>> 
>> _______________________________________________
>> NetBehaviour mailing list
>> NetBehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org
>> https://lists.netbehaviour.org/mailman/listinfo/netbehaviour
>> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> *=====================================================*
> 
> *directory http://www.alansondheim.org <http://www.alansondheim.org> tel
> 718-813-3285**email sondheim ut panix.com <http://panix.com>, sondheim ut
> gmail.com <http://gmail.com>*
> *=====================================================*
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> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 6
> Date: Thu, 12 Mar 2020 18:09:27 -0400 (EDT)
> From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: [NetBehaviour] Missouri Echo
> Message-ID: <alpine.NEB.2.21.2003121809170.1348 at panix3.panix.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed
> 
> 
> 
> Missouri Echo
> 
> bosun whistle on the Missouri River bank
> listening for the echo.
> 
> http://www.alansondheim.org/Missouribosun.jpg
> https://youtu.be/o1O1Ga6KCiY VIDEO
> 
> Missouri Echo
> bosun whistle on the Missouri River bank
> listening for the echo.
> searching for the echo in software
> listening for the music
> echoing world
> no world music here!
> gana! gana! gana!
> 
> searching for the echo in software
> gana! gana! gana!
> 
> k4% Missouri Echo
> ksh: Missouri: not found
> k5%
> k5% bosun whistle on the Missouri River bank
> ksh: bosun: not found
> k6% listening for the echo.
> ksh: listening: not found
> k7%
> k7% http://www.alansondheim.org/Missouribosun.jpg
> ksh: http://www.alansondheim.org/Missouribosun.jpg: not found
> k8% https://youtu.be/o1O1Ga6KCiY VIDEO
> ksh: https://youtu.be/o1O1Ga6KCiY: not found
> k9%
> k9% Missouri Echo
> ksh: Missouri: not found
> k10% bosun whistle on the Missouri River bank
> listening for the echo.
> ksh: bosun: not found
> k11% ksh: listening: not found
> k12% searching for the echo in software
> ksh: searching: not found
> k13% listening for the music
> echoing world
> ksh: listening: not found
> k14% ksh: echoing: not found
> k15% no world music here!
> gana! gana! gana!
> 
> ksh: no: not found
> k16% ksh: gana!: not found
> k17% k17% searching for the echo in software
> ksh: searching: not found
> k18% gana! gana! gana!
> ksh: gana!: not found
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 7
> Date: Fri, 13 Mar 2020 09:22:48 +0000 (UTC)
> From: Michael Szpakowski <m at michaelszpakowski.org>
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity
> 	<netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Cc: Edward Picot <julian.lesaux at gmail.com>, Alan Sondheim
> 	<sondheim at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [NetBehaviour] Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and
> 	the Young People
> Message-ID: <125429139.101022.1584091368521 at mail.yahoo.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
> 
> Yes I agree very much with Edward. This is beautiful and profound Alan.
> 
> 
> Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone
> 
> 
> On Thursday, March 12, 2020, 7:57 pm, Edward Picot via NetBehaviour <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org> wrote:
> 
> Yes, I like this too. And I also like your post about the goat-song and Greek tragedy, Max. 
>  Edward 
> 
>  On 12/03/2020 18:18, Max Herman via NetBehaviour wrote:
> 
> 
> #yiv8952605117 P {margin-top:0;margin-bottom:0;} 
>   Good poetry here!  
>   Reminds me of one of these in a way:  
>   https://www.nlm.nih.gov/nativevoices/exhibition/healing-ways/medicine-ways/medicine-wheel.html
> 
> 
>   From: NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on behalf of Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
> Sent: Wednesday, March 11, 2020 9:37 PM
> To: NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> Subject: [NetBehaviour] Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the Young People ?   
> 
> Why We Shouldn't Kill the Old People and the Young People
> 
> http://www.alansondheim.org/why.png
> some young and old people maybe
> 
> Old people remember wood and the hardness and softness of trees.
> Young people know images of trees and their solarization.
> Old people remember air and history.
> Young people know breathing and the annihilation of history.
> Old people remember the transition from the inertness of the
> world and its descriptions to the mapping of the world and the
> absence of the world.
> Young people know the description of the world down to the level
> of the bit, byte, and pixel.
> Old people know the transition is history and possesses its own
> inertness.
> Young people know the only horizon is that of the imminent future
> and its denouement.
> Old people remember wilderness and animals.
> Young people know classifications, sequencing, crispr, and the
> insertion of lineages into classifications, sequencing, and crispr.
> Old people remember tuning the airwaves full of sound and sight.
> Young people know the imminence of the screen and its control.
> Old people remember immanence.
> Young people know imminence.
> Old people know the tuning of the world and the care taken with
> that tuning as slaughter always approaches in the brutality of
> war, plague, and cartels.
> Young people know the incessant annihilation of the world and its
> incessant recovery.
> Old people remember the fecundity of resources.
> Young people know the horizon of scarcity and armageddon.
> Old people remember the materiality of the abacus and sliderule.
> Young people know the immateriality of the cellphone.
> Old people remember the individual.
> Young people know the projection of others.
> Old people remember the map.
> Young people know the directions and directives.
> Old people know the horror of the world.
> Young people know the world and the horror of the world.
> Old people and young people know this isn't funny.
> And I'm a comedian.
> 
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> End of NetBehaviour Digest, Vol 837, Issue 1
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