[NetBehaviour] Mathesis in Pain

Alan Sondheim sondheim at gmail.com
Sun Aug 22 16:25:17 CEST 2021


Just pointing out if you look up mathesis online you also get  "The science
of establishing a systematic <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/systematic>
order <https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/order> for things. (After
Foucault.) [from
1970s]" which is pretty much how I was using it. :-)

On Sat, Aug 21, 2021 at 1:47 PM Max Herman via NetBehaviour <
netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org> wrote:

>
> I had to look up Mathesis and found it not in the dictionary, but then
> found Leibniz's Mathesis Universalis, with its universal synthesis, art of
> combination, art of invention, and so on.
>
> In some ways, the pre-Socratics foresaw the future better than many
> post-Socratics.  Archimedes almost invented calculus twenty centuries
> before Newton and Leibniz, but only almost.  Thus going forward can go
> backwards and vice versa.
>
> Leonardo produced the best working model of the Mathesis Universalis he
> could, albeit a model for the insufficiency of which in helping humanity he
> apologized in his last breath, by synthesizing all he could.  But his
> finest insight may have been to include each human person, in its
> irreducible interwoven individuality, as a spatiotemporal center within his
> cosmological map.  The computerized machine path is literally a dead end,
> unfortunately for us and for all planetary life, if we attempt to have it
> do for us what we can only do for ourselves (like go for a walk or have a
> coffee -- a robot going for a walk for you is not you going for a walk).
>
> +++++
>
> Yet after being buried in so much very simply incorrect code, for so many
> generations, how could humanity and the planet possibly retain any capacity
> to subsist outside of tin cans?  Only by converting enough human
> individuals into a mode more conducive to life.  If it's even still
> possible, such a conversion would need to be of sufficient yet survivable
> amplitude to carry the appropriate signal as it were, and since such
> adaptation is not inevitable it will also depend on both sufficient
> conditions and choice.
>
> Assume the conditions suffice, for a given window of time, say August for
> the sake of argument -- a mere ten days.  Assume the choice will occur, for
> without both of these the change is not possible.  What remains?  Just the
> mechanism or action, i.e. an Ovidian metamorphosis of matter and energy in
> space and time, one which by definition no machine can do for us.
>
> What might such a mechanism be like, if it existed?  Of course, it might
> not and probably doesn't exist (since if it did it would already have been
> done and the planet would not be in our current situation).
>
> It would have to be something like a "key song" that once performed
> changes its environment and people just like an adaptive cellular mutation
> might in an amoeba.  The Mona Lisa was Leonardo's attempt: visual poetry
> for analysis and synthesis, plus what Leibniz called the ars inveniendi.
> It's like a wind-up doll that taps its finger, presents the instrument,
> reposes among that which is to be sung of (rivers, mountains, sky,
> garments, bridges), and silently shapes the lyrics, but doesn't sing and
> leaves that act exclusively to the apprehendant.  This makes it, by
> indirection, us, or, our us-ness, just as an inhale shapes and forms the
> exhale and makes it inevitable or almost that, or as a greeting elicits a
> greeting.
>
> Yet this is not how we generally interact with the Mona Lisa
> (Esperienza).  How do we?  Often, not at all.  Sometimes, as an unperceived
> entity to be passed in front of like a shrine.
>
> +++++
>
> Or, as the poignantly absurd 1960 "Pocket Library of Great Art," A39, on
> Leonardo da Vinci, which I carry as a totem of absurdity and hope, received
> as recompense for helping a friend's elderly relative move house along with
> many souvenir postcards of similar vintage, says with bizarre and
> heart-wrenchingly impaired awkwardness on its back cover to me as I glance
> at it, sitting by a lake, during an "extreme" drought, harassed by
> combative loud red squirrels:
>
> "The genius of Leonardo da Vinci has been the wonder of mankind for nearly
> five centuries.  In a dozen major fields of sciences and art (sic), his
> flaming curiosity, penetrating observation, and deep, widely ranging
> thought produced stupendous advances, bringing his distant world to the
> threshold of modern times.  His investigations included anatomy, geometry,
> geology, cloud formation, the principles of flight, the laws of linear and
> aerial perspective, ballistics, military engineering, physics, and
> mechanics.  To him, vision was the most important means for describing
> nature and revealing nature's harmony and order.  Through his visual genius
> he freed Italian painting from hardness and dry precision, creating ideally
> beautiful forms that seemed to move and live in a world of air, light, and
> shadow."
>
> Of course I find such boilerplate at least as noxious and noisome as
> anyone does.  It's like the droning of an instructional drone whose real
> purpose is to analyze your facial expressions for psychological
> vulnerabilities and sort you for cognitive and behavioral harvest.  It has
> a nullifying quality that is very predictable if understandable.
>
> Yet its expressions are so outrageously simplified that they can point
> maybe to something better.  By painting Leonardo as a staid and avid 1960
> Modernist we can "see" better what it omits, like what was formerly thought
> to be noise in brain scans but now is known to carry very important
> signal.
>
> The blurb omits, which I must list only with extreme brevity, Leonardo's
> truest contributions and forays which were in poetry, fiction, prose,
> philosophy, politics, ethics, psychology, history, economy, theory,
> sociology, environmentalism, and their admixtures, and the principles by
> which these all must be reunderstood in order to literally mesh with his
> overtly expressed, palatably expert, and sufficiently financed production
> of technically and decoratively admired deliverables as listed in the
> blurb.
>
> +++++
>
> After all, the US and Italy in the early decades of the Cold War were
> about as suspicious, paranoid, superficial, and tightly doctrinaire in
> their intellectual aesthetics as the embroiled principalities and
> city-states Leonardo lived in and by whom he was employed (that is, until
> he astutely fled with his corpus to France for safekeeping).  Some of that
> intense paranoia may even be returning to society today, with its attendant
> extremes, myopia, shedding of ideals, and risk of miscalculation.
>
> Yet we need not in observing such matters get overly wound up or
> despondent.  The visuals in the aforementioned booklet, printed in Italy,
> range from ok to maniacally enhanced.  The ML in particular has been
> translated into a cartoonishly airbrushed advertising style.  And with a
> touching, almost desperate longing for optimism, the inside cover promises
> or tries to promise us:
>
> "The Pocket Library of Great Art will ultimately constitute the most
> remarkable collection of art-in-reproduction ever published.  Each new
> volume, as it presents the life-enriching values that art can give, will
> bring you closer to that comprehensive knowledge of the great masters which
> all cultured people would like to have."
>
> To such a cry for hope and sales all I can think to myself by this
> lakeside estuary of amphibian migrations today is "Ah Bartleby!  Ah
> humanity!"
>
> In this manner I keep the little book with me as a reminder of something I
> obviously can't articulate.  Maybe it's just a loud or muted cry of "Ouch!"
> or "Darn it!" (which I suppose could be a charming euphemism derived from
> the days and terminology of sewing when it was done by human hands as a
> means of necessary repair to indispensable articles of clothing).
>
> Or, it could be a part of the same cloud formations as the mechanism of
> organic, cellular, or immunoresponsive gesture postulated previously, a
> first response to a first utterance, both of which may become as ordinary
> as apple pie, perhaps even soon, or votive myrtle, or fade into the
> forgotten or never-expressed expanse of unrealized meaning: "My name is
> experience, and experiment."
>
> https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathesis_universalis
>
>
> ------------------------------
> *From:* NetBehaviour <netbehaviour-bounces at lists.netbehaviour.org> on
> behalf of Alan Sondheim <sondheim at panix.com>
> *Sent:* Wednesday, August 18, 2021 1:33 AM
> *To:* NetBehaviour for networked distributed creativity <
> netbehaviour at lists.netbehaviour.org>
> *Subject:* [NetBehaviour] Mathesis in Pain
>
>
>
> Mathesis in Pain
>
> http://www.alansondheim.org/count.jpg
>
> you can count on me you can't count on me i can count on you i
> can't count on you we can count on you we can't count on you
> they can't count on me they can count on me they can't count
> on them they can't count on them
>
> trying to sleep i encounter polytopes again and again trying
> to remain sane by elucidation, enumeration, counting on them
> to give me a space to breathe for one more night. i will no
> longer be eligble for certain medical tests in a few more
> years because of age in other words i will be past the point
> of no return.
>
> with open mouths they await food and booster shots
>
>                 1 File(s)         78,344 bytes
>                 1 File(s)          1,470 bytes
> ttypb 3:11am 1 2 /net/u/10/d
> Testing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 testing 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 4 5 6 7 8 9
>                     1 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 1 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 1 1 2 3 4
> Testing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 testing 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 4 5 6 7 8 9
>                     1 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 1 1 2 3 4 5 1 2 3 4 1 1 2 3 4
> Testing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 testing 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 4 5 6 7 8 9
>      1 2 3 4 5 6
>      1 2 3 4 5 6 (the day I left Maria)
>      1 2 3 4 5 6
>      1 2 3 4 5 6 (the day I left Maria)
>                1 2 3 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1 2 3 4 5
> Testing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 testing 1 2 3 4 5 6 8 4 5 6 7 8 9
> 123456789*987654321=121932631112635269
> simply by offering it the password 1234567890 and other hackers have been
> xgnokc1234567892n1234567892m ttest<123123mjawe spell are you
> 1234567890 0987654321 k18% 7**#$)(*^%:telecome 8656 pts/1 1:11
> simply by offering it the password 1234567890 and other hackers have been
> 1234567890: 2 3 3 5 3607 3803
> 0123456789 0123456788 0123456689 0123456669 0123456666 0123446789
> ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz0123456789+/ C@`jLY
> 123456789*987654321=121932631112635269
> 0987654321: 3 3 17 17 379721
> Other Info: 98765432
> 1234567890 0987654321 k18% 7**#$)(*^%:telecome 8656 pts/1 1:11
> |           |   |           j2kCache_00000000-0000-1111-9999-000000000012
> 000.mp3 000.mp4 0000.jpg 00000000.dcm 00000000.jpg 00000001.dcm
> 05/06/2016  09:48 PM            56,974 00000000-0000-1111-9999-000000000010
> 05/06/2016  09:48 PM            55,424 00000000-0000-1111-9999-000000000011
>
> 2       grep -h " 1 " texts/*.txt | head -500 | tail -2 > zz
> 5       grep -h " 1 2 " texts/*.txt | head -100 | tail -2 >> zz
> 7       grep -h " 1 2 3 " texts/*.txt | head -320 | tail -2 >> zz
> 9       grep -h " 1 2 3 4 " texts/*.txt | head -800 | tail -2 >> zz
> 11      grep -h " 1 2 3 4 5 " texts/*.txt | tail -500 | head -2 >> zz
> 15      grep -h "1 2 3 4 5 6" texts/*.txt | tail -800 | head -2 >> zz
> 17      grep -h "1 2 3 4 5 6 7" | head -1000 | tail -2 >> zz
> 20      grep -h 12345678 texts/*.txt | tail -2000 | head -2 >> zz
> 23      grep -h 123456789 texts/*.txt | head -500 | tail -2 >> zz
> 26      grep -h 1234567890 texts/*.txt | head -2 >> zz
> 29      grep -h 0123456789 texts/*.txt | head -2 >> zz
> 30      grep -h 9876543210 texts/*.txt | head -500 | tail -2 >> zz
> 34      grep -h 987654321 texts/*.txt | head -2 >> zz
> 37      grep -h 98765 texts/*.txt | tail -2 >> zz
> 40      grep -h 00000000 texts/*.txt | tail -2 >> zz
> 41      grep -h 00000000 texts/*.txt | head -2 >> zz
>
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
> +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++ +++
>
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