<html><body><div style="color:#000; background-color:#fff; font-family:arial, helvetica, sans-serif;font-size:10pt"><div><span style="font-family: tahoma,new york,times,serif;"><br><span style="font-size: 16px;"><span><span><span><span><font>Michael Szpakowski wrote:</font></span></span></span></span></span></span></div><div style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-style: normal;"><span style="font-family: tahoma,new york,times,serif;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span><span><span>> It strikes me there's a kind of grace
 here which is available to artists and not to philosophers. Ultimately <br></span></span></span></span></span></div><div class="yui_3_7_2_17_1359127615346_72" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-style: normal;"><span style="font-size: 16px;">all philosophy is a call to action or at least a framework for it. Art, on the contrary, enables even the</span></div><div class="yui_3_7_2_17_1359127615346_73" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); background-color: transparent; font-style: normal;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span><span>personally wicked or the politically vile the redemptive act of looking carefully and making something to</span></span></span></div><div class="yui_3_7_2_17_1359127615346_74" style="color:rgb(0, 0, 0);font-size:16px;font-family:tahoma, new york, times, serif;background-color:transparent;font-style:normal;"><span style="font-size: 16px;"><span> show us, be it painting, poem, music or whatever which makes us
 more deeply human.</span></span><br><br>Michael, thanks for articulating that insight. <br><br>Bob<br><br><br><br></div>   </div></body></html>