Yes! I've been twice, each time to watch the 90 minute Leslie Thornton piece, which is stunning. I'd like to get there again before it closes if I possibly can -there's a Luke Fowler piece I'd very much like to see...
michael


From: Alan Sondheim <sondheim@panix.com>
To: netbehaviour@netbehaviour.org
Sent: Monday, February 1, 2016 3:42 AM
Subject: [NetBehaviour] London show: The Inoperative Community


Hi -

I want to recommend the gallery show, The Inoperative Community, in
London; it's remarkable. I know some of the people involved in it, as well
as some of the work, and I think it's very relevant to Netbehaviour; it
resonates well with the We Are Not Alone exhibition, for example. Do check
it out if you have the opportunity; it closes 2/14/16.

Thanks greatly,

Alan


Raven Row
56 Artillery Lane
London E1 7LS
T +44 (0)20 7377 4300
info@ravenrow.org

Wednesday to Sunday

11am7pm

The Inoperative Community
3 December 2015 - 14 February 2016

Serge Bard, Eric Baudelaire, Ericka Beckman, Cinema Action, Patrick Deval,
Lav Diaz, Mati Diop, Stephen Dwoskin, Luke Fowler, Jean-Luc Godard,
Jean-Pierre Gorin, Johan Grimonprez, Marc Karlin, Stuart Marshall,
Anne-Marie Miville, Pere Portabella, Yvonne Rainer, Jackie Raynal, Anne
Charlotte Robertson, Helke Sander, Jon Sanders, James Scott, Albert Serra,
Leslie Thornton, Humphry Trevelyan



Curated by Dan Kidner


The Inoperative Community is an exhibition of experimental narrative film
and video that address ideas of community and the shifting nature of
social relations. It draws on work made since 1968 for cinema, television
and the gallery, reflecting the overlapping and entangled histories of
these sites. The exhibitions title is borrowed from Jean-Luc Nancys 1983
essay of the same name, and while this connection did not determine the
selection of works, they all bear witness in their own way to what Nancy
characterised as the dissolution, the dislocation, or the conflagration of
community. Many concern the limits of political activism and the fate of
left political subcultures, and all use narrative as a means to explore
social and political issues.



Encompassing over fifty hours of material the exhibition can be navigated
by means of a printed or downloadable programme. Each visitor will only be
able to see a fraction of the works on offer, but connections can be made
between works on any particular course through the exhibition, which has
been designed to accommodate both prolonged viewing and shorter visits. A
screening room will show five daily programmes, in a more structured
approach to the exhibitions historical and political framework. These
begin with an Anglo-French focus before expanding to include international
filmmakers reflecting on the radical political movements of the 1960s and
1970s.



The exhibition focuses on a period that could be described as the long
1970s (1968-84)  all the works were either made during this time, or
reflect on the radical social and political movements of the era. The
defiant video installation about the Aids crisis, Journal of the Plague
Year (1984) by Stuart Marshall (194993, UK) has been specially restored
for the exhibition. Also included is a new edit  within an installation
designed for the exhibition  of Peggy and Fred in Hell (19842015) by
Leslie Thornton (b. 1951, USA), featuring footage shot whilst in residence
at Raven Row; and newly available reels from the epic Five Year Diary
(198197) by Anne Charlotte Robertson (19492012, USA), preserved by the
Harvard Film Archive, will be screened for the first time in the UK.

Extended gallery opening hours: 11am-7pm, Wednesday to Sunday

-----------

Artupdate


Home Raven Row The Inoperative Community at Raven Row: 3 December 2015  14
February...
The Inoperative Community at Raven Row: 3 December 2015  14 February 2016

    Raven Row

5 November 2015
Leslie Thornton, Peggy and Fred in Hell- Folding (1985-2015). Still from
digital video (originated on 16mm film), 95 mins. Courtesy of the artist.

Raven Row, London: 3 December 2015  14 February 2016
Opening: Wednesday 2 December, 6-9pm (Extended gallery hours Wed-Sun 11-7)
Download exhibition programme PDF (57kb)

The Inoperative Community

Serge Bard, Eric Baudelaire, Ericka Beckman, Cinema Action, Patrick Deval, Lav
Diaz, Mati Diop, Stephen Dwoskin, Luke Fowler, Jean-Luc Godard, Jean-Pierre
Gorin, Johan Grimonprez, Marc Karlin, Stuart Marshall, Anne-Marie Miville, Pere
Portabella, Yvonne Rainer, Jackie Raynal, Anne Charlotte Robertson, Helke
Sander, Jon Sanders, James Scott, Albert Serra, Leslie Thornton, Humphry
Trevelyan.

Curated by London-based writer and curator Dan Kidner,  The Inoperative
Community is an exhibition of experimental narrative film and video that
broadly address crises of sociality and community. It draws on works made since
1968 for cinema, television and the gallery, with subjects that range from the
construction of memory to game theory, and artificial intelligence. The
exhibitions title is borrowed from Jean-Luc Nancys 1986 essay of the same name,
and while this connection did not determine the selection of works, they all
bear witness in their own way to Nancys characterisation of the dissolution,
the dislocation, or the conflagration of community. Many concern the limits of
political activism and failures of the revolutionary politics of the late
1960s.

Research for the exhibition began by finding means to reconstruct Journal of
the Plague Year (1984), the defiant installation about the Aids crisis by
Stuart Marshall (194993, UK). Other significant presentations include a new
edit  within an installation designed for the exhibition  of the thirty-year
project Peggy and Fred in Hell (19842015) by Leslie Thornton (b. 1951, USA),
featuring footage shot on a residency at Raven Row; while newly available reels
from the epic Five Year Diary (198197) by Anne Charlotte Robertson (19492012,
USA), preserved by the Harvard Film Archive, will be screened for the first
time in the UK.

The exhibition  itself constituting a kind of inoperative community attempts to
reframe discussions about the overlapping and entangled histories of art,
cinema and television. Visitors will be invited to select from over fifty hours
of material. Comfortable seating has been designed to enable prolonged viewing
as well as shorter visits, while, in the manner of a film festival, all
starting times will be indicated. Alongside the galleries, a purpose-built
screening room will show five daily programmes, each a point of departure for
thinking about experimental film.

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