Hi Marc,

Yes, I actually think that this (upon reflection) is one of the crucial ingredients to good street art - that it locates culture in a physical, public way. As an example of that, cross-culturally, take a look at these ‘urban wandjina’ (a painting of a spirit, quite spooky) that are turning up on trees and walls in and around Perth: https://duckduckgo.com/?q=urban+wandjina&t=ffsb&iax=1&ia=images

I wonder what the English equivalent would be, Marc?

g.




On 05 Jul 2016, at 12:56, marc garrett <marc.garrett2@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Gretta & all,

 

I was thinking about your comments regarding ‘Home/land/culture/folklore’, and was reminded of much of my own past activities regarding street art, pirate radio and pirate television in Bristol, in the late 80s and early 90s.

 

What I found special when working in pirate radio was we were part of a grass rooted, and diverse community; collectively peer promoting our varied creative voices and identities, on shared terms. In fact, many were involved in producing some of the content as well as offering their own homes as venues for these many pirate broadcasts.

 

I think what seems to be missing from the conversation around Brexit is: whether people can now manage to reclaim their own personal, social and cultural narratives and identities; in ways that can be robust in the face of whatever government is voted in, as well as other everyday pressures that are usually imposed on the psyche via media and corporations?


Wishing you well.


marc


On 5 July 2016 at 10:01, Gretta Louw <gretta.elise.louw@gmail.com> wrote:

Definitely agree, Ruth. The other thing I was discussing with Katriona Beales last night over Skype, as a result of the last few weeks for me of the exhibition, being with the Warnayaka artists in London and here in Munich, and lots of talking, was about the notion of home and what it means. We (mostly left wing, revolutionary etc artists) tend to cringe at words like tradition and folk culture etc, but Jampijinpa has swayed me a lot and I have seen that there is a way to be attached to home (a deep notion of this) that is about land, old culture, folklore and folk culture, tradition etc that is not bound to the right wing/reactionary politics and ugly nationalism that we usually associate with those things. Home/land/culture/folklore - these can all be things that anchor and ground us without making us close off to change, people and ideas from other places, technology, and social progression. The way that the Warlpiri matter of factly appropriate digital technologies for their own cultural aims is exemplary of this. 
In these times of right wing and nationalistic hype, it seems that this goal - of defining an accepting, strong, solid, meaningful notion of home (that is rooted not in fickle political values or trends, but in the land itself), that allows ppl to feel secure enough to welcome others on their own terms (as the first nations peoples in Australia, for example, are often quoted as saying about asylum seekers today) - this is a goal that is extremely significant.

g.

p.s. Ruth, this is what the article I sent you is trying to get at. I’m not sure if it’s clear yet...




On 05 Jul 2016, at 10:45, helen varley jamieson <helen@creative-catalyst.com> wrote:

yes, it is bigger than just the EU. for example, at the beginning of the article ruth shared, it says " During membership of the EU the division between rich and poor [in the UK] has increased, with the poorest suffering a fall in living standards." but this isn't because of the EU - the same thing has happened during the same time period around the world outside of the EU, such as in new zealand. it would have happened in the UK even if they'd never been part of the EU. so it's interesting to read this interpretation of the referendum vote as a rejection of rampant neoliberal capitalism by both sides.

i'm curious about the assertion that the EU was a CIA initiative (the footnotes for the article are not on the web page). it doesn't really surprise me (is there anything left in the world that the CIA hasn't had its fingers in???) but i would like to know more about this.

i'm looking forward to chatting about it all with ruth next week :)

h : )


On 3/07/16 11:52 41AM, Joseph Young wrote:
Thanks for starting this important thread...

The key to this is changing the narrative and placing the blame for the current position squarely on our (successive) right-wing governments and their failed and unnecessary austerity policies. Whatever "European" artwork is produced has to concentrate on challenging the dominant narratives that have allowed UKIP et al to convince post industrial working class communities that the EU is to blame rather than their own government. 

Joseph Young
Artist : Activist : Cultural Producer

@artofnoises / @artsforeu

On 3 Jul 2016, at 11:13, ruth catlow <ruth.catlow@furtherfield.org> wrote:

Thanks Steven and Anita, for initiating this conversation.

I, like many people I have spoken to over the last week (including our many European friends and colleagues in the UK and on the continent) have found this last week very distressing.

The referendum promoted a narrative, supported in ALL mainstream media, (not just in the UK it seems, but across Europe)... that characterizes the British people, and especially the English, as wannabe-again-Imperialists, and (depending on their class) either dumb, uneducated and racist; or hubristic Neoliberal muppets.

This narrative is now amplified (and seemingly proved) by an upsurge of street-level racism and hostility towards our neighbours from Germany, Poland, Greece, Romania etc who have enriched our lives by making theirs in the UK.

Before the referendum, I found myself uneasy about actually campaigning for Remain in spite of my desire for pan-European peoples' alliance- because I couldn't ally myself with the dominating political arguments proposed by the Tories (and backed up by big-business and the establishment), and didn't want to participate in a process that further stamped on the dignity of people in the UK who are already so disenfranchised by the effects of austerity cuts (and many years of other systemic injustices). The social-liberal layer in the UK is now finding its voice, but the reporting of the protests reinforces the Leave-voter caricatures.

So I am looking for better information. Here's some

A UCL study has shown that the poorest 20% of British workers have indeed been affected adversely by immigration... [nevertheless]....Asked which of the following they considered to be forces for good, a considerable proportion of leave voters expressed support for multi-culturalism (29%), social liberalism (32%), globalisation (49%), the green movement (38%), feminism (40%) and even immigration (21%). About half of the voters, whether leave or remain, felt capitalism was a force for ill rather than a force for good (51%:49%).

Whatever we do, I think we need to build solidarity with other people who are suffering the effects (and they are many) of the bank crisis and resulting austerity politics.

Respect,

Ruth

<alt_chess_icon2.gif>
http://www.furtherfield.org/rcatlow/rethinking_wargames/
On 02/07/16 19:19, Steven Ball wrote:
I’m posting this to following a brief conversation with Anita McKeown, Ruth, and Marc. 

The ramifications for life in the UK after the EU referendum are still very unclear. Parliamentary politics is in meltdown and the direction of travel for future government seems to be further right, the economy is looking precarious, meanwhile a toxic wave of overt public racist violence is spreading across the country. It is tempting to think that we are entering a disturbingly illiberal dystopia. Artists cannot sit by or remain in a bubble while this happens, the necessity of responding to this situation is urgent, but what can we do, what are we doing?

The purpose of this discussion is twofold:
- Firstly and most simply to make connections, to share information about what we are doing in response as part of our practice, to share news and information of any exhibitions or opportunities to produce public responses to the current situation.
- Secondly to speculate how we might produce and present work that responds to the current situation, what is the nature of that work, who does it address, and where will it be exhibited.

We invite and welcome your action, thoughts, and ideas.




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