Hi Michael,

Yes, the questions pritchard comes up with I think are really important and relevant for artsist and arts organisations, in respect that they should look behind the hood regarding what's behind the projects/groups, supporting their art ventures.

I agree with your comments below,

>'Perhaps if we’re really interested in regeneration then spending enough
>money on the huge quantity of quality housing that’s needed, under proper
>public control might be the ticket with durability, sustainability, space
>and comfort coming well before art, but I’m sure that’s ‘old fashioned
>thinking’ .Thanks for posting the piece here :)

I also feel that big organisations such as the Tate, should not hold as much cultural weight and power over art culture as they currently do. I tend to prefer breaking down big art institutions, into smaller, decentralised, varied groups, across what ever region they may exist in. So that the art narrative (hopefully) is less top-down, and more representative of the locality. I think the ideal would be to introduce a more hybrid way of exhibiting where each show includes local people by some ratio/percentage.

Wishing you well.

marc

This is a very interesting and useful piece of writing, Marc - I hadn’t come across Pritchard’s work before. A helpfully clear eyed and sober look at magical thinking art-world players, neo-liberal wolves in sheep’s clothing and the many careerists in between! Perhaps if we’re really interested in regeneration then spending enough money on the huge quantity of quality housing that’s needed, under proper public control might be the ticket with durability, sustainability, space and comfort coming well before art, but I’m sure that’s ‘old fashioned thinking’ .Thanks for posting the piece here :)
michael 

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone

On Saturday, September 21, 2019, 12:05 pm, marc.garrett via NetBehaviour <netbehaviour@lists.netbehaviour.org> wrote:

Complexity, uncertainty & scalability: How Assemble's Granby 4 Streets won 2015 Turner Prize.

Stephen Pritchard.

"Did Assemble really play such a big part in Granby 4 Streets?  How 'community-led' was the project?  What was the role of the Community Land Trust?  How did Assemble come to win the Turner Prize 2015?  Who were the private social investors and what did they do to help make the project happen?

The intention here is to blow open the façade behind Granby 4 Streets, Assemble and the Turner Prize 2015 win.

This is a long read and part of my research into art-led regeneration projects that are often far more complex than is often portrayed.

I argue that the media and art world picture of Assemble is overly simplistic and masks a far more complex and uncertain set of events that, ultimately, relied on 'mystery' private social investors to force local government to act in support of the project and to lever money from national grant funders."

http://tiny.cc/dqq4cz
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